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Collingham Parish

Notts Alerts

Notts alerts are issued by Nottinghamshire Police - If you wish to sign up to receive these direct please register here

These alerts contains warnings and/or news about the Nottinghamshire Police Force.  Some residents have found the warnings to be useful, especially as details are given on how to deal with an incident and who to contact (if applicable)

You can see all the latest alerts on the Neighbourhood Alert website

 

16 October 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch

Lisa Parker (NHWN, Register Administrator, England & Wales)

Tackling Domestic Abuse is a national priority for the Home Office, Police, Neighbourhood Watch and Crimestoppers.
Neighbourhood Watch is working with Crimestoppers to raise awareness about domestic abuse and what our supporters and volunteers can do to help prevent and report it. 
We would be grateful if you could spend just 3 minutes completing this survey, the results of which will help us to  signpost people to the right place to report their concerns. Your responses are completely anonymous.  
You can complete the survey by clicking on the link below.
https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/NWN-DV-Survey

 

12 October 2017

A public consultation on how the Nottinghamshire and City of Nottingham Fire and Rescue Authority can better align its resources, and make the necessary financial savings between now and 2020 commenced on Friday 22nd of September 2017.   This twelve week consultation, which ends 17th December 2017 seeks residents views on the proposals of mixed crewing option, which could potentially be introduced at two of three fire stations – Ashfield, Retford or Worksop – offering The Notts Fire & Rescue service a saving of £500,000 per year, per station.

Questionnaires can be completed by accessing http://www.opinionresearch.co.uk/nfrs
Also, Notts Fire offer Home Safety checks further information can be accessed via Notts Fire and Rescue website

https://www.notts-fire.gov.uk/home

 

20 August 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood & Home Watch Network

Lisa Parker (NHWN, Register Administrator, England & Wales)

Here’s the latest edition of Neighbourhood Watch’s e-newsletter Our News.

Click here to read it and find out why Neighbourhood Watch is the largest grassroots crime prevention movement in England and Wales.

Neighbourhood Watch is proud to be supported by the Co-op Insurance and ERA Home Security.
 

11 August 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Rhodri Williams (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Notts)

Statistics show that every 15 seconds, someone reports a fraud in the UK. Nottinghamshire County Council Trading Standards Officers are supporting vulnerable people who have become victims of mass marketing scams.   Many Nottinghamshire residents contacted have lost £1,000s to these scams.    

Friends Against Scams is a national initiative which aims to inspire action, highlight the scale of the problem and raise awareness of scams.  You can help by signing up to the campaign and completing a short training package at www.friendsagainstscams.org.uk

Anyone can register to become a Friend Against Scams.  Upon completion of the training, people are encouraged to share their knowledge with their friends and family.

 

17 June 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) and Action Fraud have recently noticed a rise in the reporting of pets, and in particular puppies and kittens, being advertised for sale via popular online auction websites. The fraudsters will place an advert of the pet for sale, often claiming that the pet is currently held somewhere less accessible or overseas. Upon agreement of a sale, the suspect will usually request an advance payment by money transfer or bank transfer. However, the pet does not materialise and the fraudster will subsequently ask for further advanced payments for courier charges, shipping fees and additional transportation costs. Even if further payments are made, the pet will still not materialise as it is likely to not exist.

Tips to staying safe when purchasing pets:

  • Stay within auction guidelines.
  • Be cautious if the seller initially requests payment via one method, but later claims that due to ‘issues with their account’ they will need to take the payment via an alternative method such as a bank transfer.
  • Consider conducting research on other information provided by the seller, for example a mobile phone number or email address used by the seller could alert you to any negative information associated with the number/email address online. 
  • Request details of the courier company being used and consider researching it.
  • Agree a suitable time to meet face-to-face to agree the purchase and to collect the pet. If the seller is reluctant to meet then it could be an indication that the pet does not exist.
  • A genuine seller should be keen to ensure that the pet is going to a caring and loving new home. If the seller does not express any interest in you and the pet’s new home, be wary.
  • If you think the purchase price is too good to be true then it probably is, especially if the pet is advertised as a pure-breed.
  • Do not be afraid to request copies of the pet’s inoculation history, breed paperwork and certification prior to agreeing a sale. If the seller is reluctant or unable to provide this information it could be an indication that either the pet does not exist or the pet has been illegally bred e.g. it originates from a ‘puppy farm’. A ‘puppy farm’ is a commercial dog breeding enterprise where the sole aim is to maximise profit for the least investment. Commercial dog breeders must be registered with their local authority and undergo regular inspections to ensure that the puppies are bred responsibly and are in turn fit and healthy. Illegally farmed puppies will often be kept in inadequate conditions and are more likely to suffer from ailments and illnesses associated with irresponsible breeding.
  • When thinking of buying a pet, consider buying them in person from rescue centres or from reputable breeders.
  • If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting  www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.

 

17 June 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert.  This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood & Home Watch Network

Lisa Parker (NHWN, Register Administrator, England & Wales)

We're Neighbourhood Watch - the largest grassroots crime prevention movement in England and Wales.
We're celebrating National Neighbourhood Watch Week (June 17-25) with a bumper edition of our bi-monthly e-newsletter Our News.
Click here to read it and find out how Neighbourhood Watch is helping to connect and protect communities.
Best wishes from the NHWN team
Neighbourhood Watch is proud to be supported by the Co-op Insurance and ERA Home Security.

 

15 June 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Notts Police

Paul Dickinson (Police, Partnership Coordinator , Nottinghamshire)

If you want to influence what issues your local beat team focuses on where you live or work for the next three months, complete our online Neighbourhood Priority Survey.

Together with meetings with residents and community feedback, the results of the surveys are used to help local beat teams set their priorities.

Completed anonymously, the survey asks you to explain what concerns you have about criminal activity where you live. It asks for information about a range of concerns, including antisocial behaviour, speeding, street drinking, nuisance vehicles and other criminal activity.

You can give more information about the offences being committed and the days and times incidents are happening. You can also pinpoint exactly where the problems are, with a marker on a map.

The information you enter into the site will help your local beat team decide which issues are most important to people in your area. www.facebook.com/nottspolice

 

12 June 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert.  This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters have been advertising vehicles and machinery for sale on various selling platforms online. The victims, after communicating via email with the fraudster, will receive a bogus email which purports to be from an established escrow provider (a third party who will keep the payment until the buying and selling parties are both happy with the deal).
These emails are designed to persuade victims to pay upfront, via bank transfer, before visiting the seller to collect the goods. The emails also claim that the buyer (victim) has a cooling off period to reclaim the payment if they change their mind. This gives victims the false sense of security that their money is being looked after by this trustworthy third party, when in fact it is not and the money has gone straight to the fraudster.
Protect yourself:

  • When making a large purchase such as a new car or machinery, always meet the seller face to face first and ask to see the goods before transferring any money.
  • If you receive a suspicious email asking for payment, check for spelling, grammar, or any other errors, and check who sent the email. If in doubt, check feedback online by searching the associated phone numbers or email addresses of the seller.
  • Contact the third party the fraudsters are purporting to be using to make the transaction. They should be able to confirm whether the email you have received is legitimate or not.
  • False adverts often offer vehicles or machinery for sale well below market value to entice potential victims; always be cautious. If it looks too good to be true then it probably is.

If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk, or by calling 0300 123 2040.

 

5 June 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert.  This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

With the upcoming “Wedding Season”, and for those individuals who are considering making plans for next year and beyond, you should be aware of the potential risks of fraud involved. 
According to ‘bridesmagazine.co.uk’, in 2017 the average wedding cost spend is approximately £30,111.  This will be paid out to multiple vendors, including; photographers, caterers, reception venues and travel companies, to name a few.  Many of these services will require booking at least several months in advance and you may be obliged to pay a deposit or even the full balance at the time. 
Being aware of the potential risks and following the below prevention advice could minimise the likelihood of fraud:

Paying by Credit Card will provide you with protection under Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act, for purchases above £100 and below £30,000. This means that even if a Company goes into liquidation before your big day, you could claim a refund through your Credit Card Company.

Social Media - Some Companies run their businesses entirely via social media sites, offering low cost services.  Whilst many are genuine, some may not be insured or may even be fraudulent. There are a few things you can do to protect yourself;

  •  Ensure you obtain a physical address and contact details for the vendor and verify this information.  Should you experience any problems, you will then be able to make a complaint to Trading Standards or consider pursuing via the Small Claims Court.
  • Ensure you obtain a contract before paying money for services.  Make certain you fully read and understand what you are signing and note the terms of cancellation. 

Consider purchasing Wedding Insurance - Policies vary in cover and can be purchased up to two years in advance.  They can protect you from events that would not be covered under the Consumer Credit Act.

Complete research on each vendor, ensuring you are dealing with a bona fide person or company.  Explore the internet for reviews and ratings and ask the vendor to provide details of past clients you can speak to. You should do this even if using companies recommended by a trustworthy friend or source.   

For services such as wedding photographers, beware of websites using fake images. Look for inconsistencies in style; Meet the photographer in person and ask to view sample albums. If you like an image from a wedding, ask to view the photographs taken of the whole event so you can see the overall quality.    

Remember, if something appears too good to be true, it probably is!

 

5 June 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Changing Face of Crime

Thank you to all members who recently supported our annual conference and A.G.M. This year’s theme was the Changing Face of Crime. We were fortunate to have five excellent speakers including the newly appointed Deputy Chief Constable, Rachel Barber and DI Les Charlton from Notts Police’s Digital Investigation and Intelligence Unit, who gave an interesting insight into modern crime trends, plus sound advice to avoid becoming a victim of cyber crime.
Our Annual General Meeting followed the conference at which our two Chairmen, Mr John Wood and Dr David Rhodes, elected since the amalgamation of the County NottsWatch and City CNNWC, resigned.
An Executive meeting of the Trustees followed the A.G.M. to elect new Officers.  See “Who are we” for details.
Full details of the Conference and A.G.M. can be read from the links above in blue.

 

31 May 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

This message is sent for  PCSO 7818 Louise Down
Please see the attachment

 

26 May 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Smishing – the term used for SMS phishing – is an activity which enables criminals to steal victims’ money or identity, or both, as a result of a response to a text message. Smishing uses your mobile phone (either a smartphone or traditional non-internet connected handset) to manipulate innocent people into taking various actions which can lead to being defrauded.
The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has received information that fraudsters are targeting victims via text message, purporting to be from their credit card provider, stating a transaction has been approved on their credit card.
The text message further states to confirm if the transaction is genuine by replying ‘Y’ for Yes or ‘N’ for No.
Through this method the fraudster would receive confirmation of the victim’s active telephone number and would be able to engage further by asking for the victim’s credit card details, CVV number (the three digits on the back of your bank card) and/or other personal information.
Protect yourself:

  • Always check the validity of the text message by contacting your credit card provider through the number provided at the back of the card or on the credit card/bank statement.
  • Beware of cold calls purporting to be from banks and/or credit card providers.
  • If the phone call from the bank seems suspicious, hang up the phone and wait for 10 minutes before calling the bank back. Again, refer to the number at the back of the card or on the bank statement in order to contact your bank.
  • If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to Action Fraud at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/ or alternatively by calling 0300 123 2040

 

23 May 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud has received the first reports of Tech-Support scammers claiming to be from Microsoft who are taking advantage of the global WannaCry ransomware attack.

One victim fell for the scam after calling a ‘help’ number advertised on a pop up window. The window which wouldn’t close said the victim had been affected by WannaCry Ransomware.

The victim granted the fraudsters remote access to their PC after being convinced there wasn’t sufficient anti-virus protection. The fraudsters then installed Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool, which is actually free and took £320 as payment.

It is important to remember that Microsoft’s error and warning messages on your PC will never include a phone number.

Additionally Microsoft will never proactively reach out to you to provide unsolicited PC or technical support. Any communication they have with you must be initiated by you.

How to protect yourself

  • Don't call numbers from pop-up messages.
  • Never allow remote access to your computer.
  • Always be wary of unsolicited calls. If you’re unsure of a caller’s identity, hang up.
  • Never divulge passwords or pin numbers.
  • Microsoft or someone on their behalf will never call you.

If you believe you have already been a victim

  • Get your computer checked for any additional programmes or software that may have been installed.
  • Contact your bank to stop any further payments being taken.

Report fraud and cyber crime to Actionfraud.police.uk

 

15 May 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Following the ransomware cyber attack on Friday 12 May which affected the NHS and is believed to have affected other organisations globally, the City of London Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has issued an alert urging both individuals and businesses to follow protection advice immediately and in the coming days.
Ransomware is a form of malicious software (Malware) that enables cyber criminals to remotely lock down files on your computer or mobile device. Criminals will use ransomware to extort money from you (a ransom), before they restore access to your files. There are many ways that ransomware can infect your device, whether it be a link to a malicious website in an unsolicited email, or through a security vulnerability in a piece of software you use.
Key Protect messages for businesses to protect themselves from ransomware:

  • Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.
  • Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.
  • Create regular backups of your important files to a device that isn’t left connected to your network as any malware infection could spread to that too.

The National Cyber Security Centre’s technical guidance includes specific software patches to use that will prevent uninfected computers on your network from becoming infected with the “WannaCry” Ransomware: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/ransomware-latest-ncsc-guidance
For additional in-depth technical guidance on how to protect your organisation from ransomware, details can be found here: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/protecting-your-organisation-ransomware
Key Protect advice for individuals:

  • Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.
  • Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.
  • Create regular backups of your important files to a device (such as an external hard drive or memory stick) that isn’t left connected to your computer as any malware infection could spread to that too.
  • Only install apps from official app stores, such as Google’s Play Store, or Apple’s App Store as they offer better levels of protection than some 3rd party  stores. Jailbreaking, rooting, or disabling any of the default security features of your device will make it more susceptible to malware infections.

 Phishing/smishing
Fraudsters may exploit this high profile incident and use it as part of phishing/smishing campaigns. We urge people to be cautious if they receive any unsolicited communications from the NHS. The protect advice for that is the following:

  • An email address can be spoofed. Don’t open attachments or click on the links within any unsolicited emails you receive, and never respond to emails that ask for your personal or financial details. 
  • The sender’s name and number in a text message can be spoofed, so even if the message appears to be from an organisation you know of, you should still exercise caution, particularly if the texts are asking you to click on a link or call a number.

Don’t disclose your personal or financial details during a cold call, and remember that the police and banks will never ring you and ask you to verify your PIN, withdraw your cash, or transfer your money to another “safe” account.
If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to Action Fraud at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
 

10 May 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Tim Watson (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nott)

Nottinghamshire County Council’s Trading Standards Service have responded to several incidents in the past month involving bogus tree surgeons. Elderly residents have been cold called at the door and then large amounts of money have been demanded for unnecessary work. Bogus tree surgeons often use vehicles that look legitimate, which are sign written and are also towing equipment.
This time of year does see a rise in fraudulent activity related to garden and house maintenance.   
Never buy from uninvited callers, especially at the door.  Always tell cold callers you are not interested. We would advise you to always get 3 quotes and use http://www.checkatrade.com to find legitimate traders.

 

4 May 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

There has been a series of recent incidents reported to Action Fraud where a lone fraudster has approached victims whom they believe to be unfamiliar with the local area. They make an excuse to talk to the victims such as enquiring about directions or offering a recommendation for a good hotel.
After this interaction, several other fraudsters will intervene purporting to be police officers in plain clothes and will sometimes present false identification as proof. The fake officers will then give a reason to examine the victims’ wallet, purse or personal items. They may also examine the first fraudster’s items or try to tell victims that the first fraudster is suspicious in order to gain victim trust and appear more realistic in their guise.
fter all the fake police ‘checks’ are finished, victims have then reported being handed back their personal items only to later realise that a quantity of money or valuables were missing.
How to protect yourself:

  • If an individual claims to be a police officer ask for their name and rank, force, and examine any identification presented; this is always good practice but especially important if they are not wearing a uniform.
  • The Police will never ask for your passwords or PIN details. Do not give this information to anyone.
  • The Police will never request that you withdraw/transfer any money to them or to a ‘safe’ account.
  • If you have been affected by this, or any other fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

4 May 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

Alert: Collingham Village.
Information Seek: Vehicle Theft.
Bet: 8:30pm 03/05/2017 and 6:00am 04/05/2017
Unknown person(s) have stolen a Black VW Tiguan SE TDI FV66XXK.
Location: Station Road, Collingham Village. Newark.
Incident Ref: 86-04052017.
Were you in the area at the time?
Do you have any CCTV?
If you have seen or heard anything or have any CCTV in relation to this Incident please would you contact Nottinghamshire Police on 101 (non-emergency number) quoting the crime reference number.
If you do have information regarding this crime but wish to remain anonymous you can call Crimestoppers Free on 0800 555 111

 

3 May 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

Alert: Collingham Village.
Information Seek: Vehicle Theft.
Bet: 10:00pm 02/05/2017 and 8:00am 03/05/2017

Unknown person(s) have stolen a White Audi A6 S-Line GK64DOJ.
Location: Rio Drive, Collingham Village. Newark.
Incident Ref: 117-03052017.
Were you in the area at the time?
If you have seen or heard anything in relation to this Incident please would you contact Nottinghamshire Police on 101 (non-emergency number) quoting the crime reference number.
If you do have information regarding this crime but wish to remain anonymous you can call Crimestoppers Free on 0800 555 111

 

29 April 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

Collingham Village Burglary Alert.
Appeal for information

Incident 1
Bet: 6:30pm 20/04/2017 & 11:00am 21/04/2017
Location: Property located off Dykes End, Collingham Village.
Unknown person(s) have gained entry to a garage taking food items from a freezer.
Incident Ref: 311-28042017.

Incident 2
Bet: 10:30am 28/04/2017 & 7:00pm 28/04/2017
Location: Property located off Newark Road, Collingham Village.
Unknown person(s) have gained entry to a property and taken items from within.
Incident Ref: 784-28042017.

If you have seen or heard anything in relation to these incidents please would you contact Nottinghamshire Police on 101 (non-emergency number) quoting the appropriate crime reference number.
If you do have information regarding these crimes but wish to remain anonymous you can call Crimestoppers Free on 0800 555 111

 

28 April 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Tim Watson (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nott)

Nottinghamshire County Council Trading Standards has a Nominated Neighbour Scheme to help protect vulnerable people from unscrupulous doorstep callers and rogue traders. If you live in Nottinghamshire then you can Nominate a Neighbour to deal with uninvited callers on your behalf. Alternatively you may be a neighbour of a vulnerable person and would like to find out more about becoming a Nominated Neighbour.  If you are interested in finding out more about the scheme then please contact the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06 who will refer your enquiry through to Nottinghamshire County Council Trading Standards.

 

13 April 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Wonga has confirmed a data breach where up to 250,000 accounts have been compromised. The incident is now being investigated by the police and has been reported to the Financial Conduct Authority.
Wonga has updated their website with further information and confirmed that they are contacting all those affected and are taking steps to protect them, but there are also some things you can do to keep your information secure.

Here’s what you can do to make yourself safer:
If any of your financial details were compromised, notify your bank or card company as soon as possible. Review your financial statements regularly for any unusual activity.
Criminals can use personal data obtained from a data breach to commit identity fraud. Consider using credit reference agencies, such as Experian or Equifax, to regularly monitor your credit file for unusual activity.
Be suspicious of any unsolicited calls, emails or texts, even if it appears to be from a company you know of. Don’t open the attachments or click on links within unsolicited emails, and never disclose any personal or financial details during a cold call.
If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to us: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud
 

11 April 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

This Alert is to advise you that a Burglary has occurred.
Bet: 5:00pm 10/04/2017 & 7:30am 11/04/2017.
Location: Langford Quarry Site, A1133 near to Collingham Village.
Unknown person(s) have entered 2 secure container units belonging to the RSPB, from within they have stolen a Green Honda Quad Bike and Trailer along with a Green and Red Wessex Rotary Mower.
Incident Ref: 227-11042017.
Were you in the area?
If you have seen or heard anything in relation to this incident please would you contact Nottinghamshire Police on 101 (non-emergency number) quoting the crime reference number.
If you do have information regarding this crime but wish to remain anonymous you can call Crimestoppers Free on 0800 555 111

 

9 April 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Richard Brown (Police, Senior Digital Officer, Notts)

Nottinghamshire Police have issued a warning following a series of distraction burglaries targeting homes across the county during the recent warm weather.
A total of 11 burglaries have been reported in similar circumstances since Thursday 6 April, with homeowners having been targeted after being approached by rogue traders proposing home improvement works.
While residents have been in conversation, an accomplice has entered the property through unlocked doors or windows to steal items.
Chief Inspector Phil Davies from Nottinghamshire Police said: "It's only natural that people will be enjoying the recent fine weather - but it is so important that residents stay on their guard to avoid being targeted by would-be criminals.
"Even if you're out and about in the garden, always keep windows and doors locked to deter opportunist thieves and never purchase goods or services from anyone who calls unexpectedly at your home.
"We are also asking you to keep an eye out for vulnerable friends, family members and neighbours and warn them about these recent incidents to ensure they are doing all they can to protect themselves and their properties."
The latest series of distraction burglaries have taken place across the county in Aspley, Carlton, Mansfield and Underwood.
Each report mentions a man in a white Ford Transit van approaching residents to suggest works to fix guttering. Up to three men are believed to have been involved in these incidents.
Anyone with any information about these incidents or who witnesses anything suspicious in their area is asked to call Nottinghamshire Police on 101, quoting incident 442 of 9 April. If the crime is in progress or the offenders are still in the area, call 999 immediately.
For more information about protecting yourself and your property from opportunist thieves, please visit http://www.nottinghamshire.police.uk/advice/prevention/distraction

 

6 April 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of The Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

This Alert is to advise you that a Burglary has occurred near Collingham Village.
Bet: 09:15pm 05/04/2017 & 9:40pm 05/04/2017
Location: Property located off Whitemoor Lane, Collingham Village.
Unknown person(s) have entered a property making off with cash
Incident Ref: 933-05042017.
Were you in the area?
If you have seen or heard anything in relation to this incident please would you contact Nottinghamshire Police on 101 (non-emergency number) quoting the crime reference number.
If you do have information regarding this crime but wish to remain anonymous you can call Crimestoppers Free on 0800 555 111

 

3 April 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters are sending out a high volume of phishing emails to personal and business email addresses, pretending to come from various email addresses, which have been compromised.
 
The subject line contains the recipient’s name, and the main body of text is as below:
 “Hi, [name]!
 I am disturbing you for a very serious reason. Although we are not familiar, but I have significant amount of individual info concerning you. The thing is that, most likely mistakenly, the data of your account has been emailed to me.
For instance, your address is: [real home address]
I am a law-abiding citizen, so I decided to personal data may have been hacked. I attached the file – [surname].dot that I received, that you could explore what info has become obtainable for scammers. File password is – 2811
Best Wishes,”
 
The emails include an attachment – a ‘.dot’ file usually titled with the recipient’s name.

This attachment is thought to contain the Banking Trojan Ursniff/Gozi, hidden within an image in the document. The Ursniff Banking Trojan attempts to obtain sensitive data from victims, such as banking credentials and passwords. The data is subsequently used by criminals for monetary gain.

Protect Yourself:

Having up-to-date virus protection is essential; however it will not always prevent your device(s) from becoming infected.
Please consider the following actions:

  • Don’t click on links or open any attachments you receive in unsolicited emails or SMS messages: Remember that fraudsters can ‘spoof’ an email address to make it look like one used by someone you trust. If you are unsure, check the email header to identify the true source of communication (you can find out how by searching the internet for relevant advice for your email provider).
  • Do not enable macros in downloads; enabling macros will allow Trojan/malware to be installed onto your device.
  • Always install software updates as soon as they become available. Whether you are updating the operating system or an application, the update will often include fixes for critical security vulnerabilities.
  • Create regular backups of your important files to an external hard drive, memory stick or online storage provider. It is important that the device you back up to is not connected to your computer as any malware infection could spread to that as well.
  • If you think your bank details have been compromised, you should contact your bank immediately.

If you have been affected by this or any other fraud, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visit www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

23 January 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Rhodri Williams (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Notts)

Trading Standards have received reports that there is a scam email circulating stating that people are entitled to a refund of their TV Licence fee. 
The aim of the emails is to steal bank details.  The link in the email sends people to a website that looks like the TV Licensing own website with a form to complete.
Always be suspicious of unsolicited emails that are supposedly from a trusted organisation because the address can easily be faked.  Never a click on any links before stopping to check that they are genuine.
Genuine emails from TV Licensing will never ask you to provide bank details or personal information.  

7 ways to spot an email you’ve been sent is a scam:

  1. The sender’s address doesn’t match the website address of the organisation it says it’s from. Roll your mouse pointer over the sender’s name to reveal its true address.
  2. The email doesn’t use your proper name – using something like “Dear customer” instead.
  3. There’s a sense of urgency, asking you to act immediately.
  4. There’s a prominent website link which may seem like the proper address, but with one character different.
  5. There’s a request for personal information.
  6. There are spelling and grammatical errors.
  7. The entire text of the email is within an image rather than the usual text format and the image contains an embedded hyperlink to a bogus site. Again roll your mouse pointer over the link to reveal its true destination.

For further details regarding TV Licences and how to obtain a refund please visit their official website at www.tvlicensing.co.uk

 

23 January 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Payment diversion alert 
Fraudsters are emailing members of the public who are expecting to make a payment for property repairs. The fraudsters will purport to be a tradesman who has recently completed work at the property and use a similar email address to that of the genuine tradesman. They will ask for funds to be transferred via bank transfer. Once payment is made the victims of the scam soon realise they have been deceived when the genuine tradesman requests payment for their services.
Protect yourself

  • Always check the email address is exactly the same as previous correspondence with the genuine contact.
  • For any request of payment via email verify the validity of the request with a phone call to the person who carried out the work.
  • Check the email for spelling and grammar as these signs can indicate that the email is not genuine.
  • Payments via bank transfer offer no financial protection; consider using alternative methods such as a credit card or PayPal which offer protection and an avenue for recompense.

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.
 

5 January 2017

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud has received several reports from victims who have been sent convincing looking emails claiming to be from Amazon. The spoofed emails from “service@amazon.co.uk” claim recipients have made an order online and mimic an automatic customer email notification.  
The scam email claims recipients have ordered an expensive vintage chandelier. Other reported examples include: Bose stereos, iPhone’s and luxury watches. 
The emails cleverly state that if recipients haven’t authorised the transaction they can click on the help centre link to receive a full refund. The link leads to an authentic-looking website, which asks victims to confirm their name, address, and bank card information.
Amazon says that suspicious e-mails will often contain:

  • Links to websites that look like Amazon.co.uk, but aren't Amazon.co.uk.
  • Attachments or prompts to install software on your computer.
  • Typos or grammatical errors.
  • Forged (or spoofed) e-mail addresses to make it look like the e-mail is coming from Amazon.co.uk.

 Amazon will never ask for personal information to be supplied by e-mail.
You can read more about identifying suspicious emails claiming to be from Amazon by visiting https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201489210
 To report a fraud or cyber crime, call us on 0300 123 2040.

 

20 December 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Attached is a message from NottsWatch Festive Season Greetings

Attached files: NottsWatch Christmas Greetings_2016.pdf

 

16 December 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Tim Watson (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nottinghamshire)

Nottinghamshire County Council Trading Standards are warning people to beware of bogus telephone calls purporting to be from a solicitor.
Officers are issuing the warning as a report has been made by a Nottinghamshire resident stating that they have received a cold call in which a recorded message told them that they were being prosecuted and that they needed to press button “1” to contact their solicitor.
The resident realised the call was a scam and ended the call. From our experience we believe it is likely that had the resident followed the instruction to press button “1”  they would have been drawn into a scam involving an attempt to extract money or personal/bank details from the resident.
Nottinghamshire County Council’s advice is not to answer any personal questions during cold calls and to end the call immediately.
Any information about a prosecution would in the first place come from the prosecuting authority in a written form. The information would not be conveyed through a recorded message from a phone call.
If  bogus callers have given you information which may help trace them, please report it to
Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or visit http://www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

13 December 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Lloyds customers should be on the lookout for a new sophisticated fraud that involves fraudsters sending fake bank letters. 
The convincing letters being sent are a replica template from Lloyds and include their logo, address and signature from a customer service representative.  
The letter tells recipients that there have been some “unusual transactions” on their personal account and asks them to call a number highlighted in bold to confirm they are genuine. 
When victims call the number, an automated welcome message is played and the caller is asked to enter their card number, account number and sort code followed by their date of birth. Victims are then instructed to enter the first and last digit of their security number.
The fraud was spotted by the Daily Telegraph who was alerted to it by a reader who had three identical letters sent to an office address. On separate occasions the Daily Telegraph ran some tests using fake details and were passed to fraudsters who claimed to be from a Lloyds contact centre. The bank has confirmed that the phone number and letters are fake. 
The letters are essentially a sophisticated phishing attempt and serves as a warning to consumers to question written correspondence from their banks. 
If you are ever suspicious about correspondence from your bank you should call the customer serviced number on the back of their card. 
To report a fraud and cyber crime, call us on 0300 123 2040 or visit http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud

 

24 November 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Richard Dunn (Police, PCSO 8254, Sherwood)

There has been a burglary on Archers Field in Southwell between 11am and 3.40pm on 22/11/16. Entry gained via the rear french doors. Expensive items taken from the property including watches. There have also been some door to door sellers. One male was spoken to by the local Police after a report came in from Westhorpe. The male was located on Trinity Road. He was asked to leave the area after a check on his background was carried out
PLEASE do not buy anything off these sellers as they hardly ever have any ID or hold a traders licence. Thanks and stay safe!
PCSO 8254 Richard Dunn
Southwell Contact Point
Council Offices
The Burgage
07595074292

 

12 November 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Richard Dunn (Police, PCSO 8254, Sherwood)

5 Burglaries have been reported in Southwell since Tuesday 08/11. Entry gained via rear window or Patio doors. I'm asking residents to remain vigilant and report anything that looks suspicious to 101, especially with the dark nights upon us.
There has now been 10 reported Burglaries in the Sherwood area since last Sunday, 5 in Southwell, 2 in Ollerton, 1 in Clipstone, 1 in Farnsfield and the other in Epperstone. Thanks and stay safe!
PCSO 8254 Richard Dunn
Southwell Contact Point
Council Offices
The Burgage
07595074292
 

5 November 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

This is to advise you that a quantity of Copper has been stolen from a site on Potter Hill Road, Collingham.
This has happened over the last twelve months, whereby offender(s) have entered a mobile phone mast site and removed a quantity of copper.
Crime Ref : 723-03112016
 

3 November 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Richard Dunn (Police, PCSO 8254, Sherwood)

There have been a number of Burglaries on the Sherwood area over the last few days. Outbuildings have also been targeted. A property in Morton was entered with expensive items taken during the morning of 03/11, also a property in Brinkley was entered on 01/11, via a rear patio door, again expensive electrical items taken. An outbuilding was also entered in Ossington, again electrical items taken.
PLEASE remember if you see think something in your area looks suspicious, then it is! Always call 101 for anything suspicious or 999 if you think a crime is being committed, thanks and stay safe!.

 

31 October 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

Sometime between 6:00pm on 29th Oct and 7:00am on 30th Oct while the occupants were away entry was gained to a property on Swinderby Road, South Scarle.
A selection of jewellery and cash have been taken.
Incident ref : 348-30102016
Please contact the Police on 101 if you saw or heard anything in relation to this crime.
If you do have any information but wish to remain anonymous you can call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111

.

19 October 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Richard Dunn (Police, PCSO 8254, Sherwood)

There have been 5 burglaries around the North Muskham and Oxton area's between 16/10 and 18/10, all during daylight hours.

Security in your home

Most burglars are opportunists and they will look for unlocked doors or opened windows to get in.

Securing your doors and windows

Two-thirds of burglars gain entry through a door and one third get in through a window. Fitting your doors and windows with good locks can go a long way to deterring them.

Fit your front door with the following:

  • An automatic rim latch lock (also called a nightlatch). These can be opened from the inside without a key.
  • A five-lever mortice deadlock with kitemark BS3621.
  • A letter-box cage to prevent thieves tampering with locks through the letter box.
  • Fit your back door with a five-lever mortice deadlock. Fit both sides of French doors with a security mortice lock and mortice bolt, and get advice on fitting locks to patio doors.

Make outside doors stronger by:

  • fitting hinge bolts for extra security
  • replacing glass panels with laminated glass to make them more difficult to break (or buy special film to stick on that will have the same effect)
  • fitting a peephole and security chain to your front door.
  • Fit window locks with keys to all your downstairs windows and any others that are easy to reach. Keep window keys in a safe place, out of sight and reach. Keep them close to the window so that you can find them easily if you needed to escape in the event of fire, but not on the windowsill.

It is best to get locks and bolts fitted by a qualified locksmith - check whether the locksmith is a member of the Master Locksmiths Association (MLA) by using the guide on their website.

Most of our local Age UKs run a handyperson scheme to provide and fit locks and spy holes.

Locking up

Most burglars are opportunists and they will look for unlocked doors or opened windows to get in.

  • Lock all outside doors and check all your windows are locked. Even if you're just popping out for a few minutes, lock up fully before you go.
  • If you have a carer or relative with their own key, make sure they securely fasten your door on their way out.
  • Keep your ladder and garden tools locked away.
  • Keep your keys, including your car keys, in a safe place. Don't leave them in the locks or lying around the house. Remember, the first places a burglar will look for your door key is under the doormat, in a flower-pot or on a piece of string through the letter box.
  • Keep valuables out of sight.
  • Leave a front room light on if you go out for the evening and consider leaving the radio on. Draw the curtains, leaving a gap at the top so the light can be seen from outside.

For more advice on keeping your home secure, contact your local Safer Neighbourhood team at your nearest police station or check to see whether your regional police force has security tips on its website.

Security devices

  • Outdoor lighting not only acts as a deterrent, but also makes it easier to find your way if you're coming or going after dark. You can install a low-level light that automatically switches on from dusk until dawn. Or you can get a light that switches on when it senses movement outside your home.
  • Visible burglar alarms will deter opportunist burglars and increase the security of your home.

If you're considering installing a burglar alarm:

  • ask the Safer Neighbourhood team at your nearest police station for advice
  • get at least three quotes and specialist advice from alarm companies
  • ask your insurance company which alarm companies it recommends
  • get professional help to install the alarm. There are schemes all over the UK offering home security services. Some home improvement agencies offer free services to improve security.

Your valuables

Think about marking your possessions with your postcode and the number of your house or flat. This deters burglars because it makes stolen property harder to sell. Ask your local Neighbourhood Watch or the Safer Neighbourhood team at your local police station for help with this.

You can register your valuable possessions for free at www.immobilise.com. This website helps police identify owners of lost or stolen property.

If you go away

Keep your home safe if you're going to be away for a longer time:

  • Cancel your regular deliveries (if a burgler sees parcels or newspapers on your doorstep, it's easier to tell that you're away.
  • Don't close curtains or blinds, as they are a giveaway during the day.
  • Plug a lamp into a time switch that will automatically turn on in the evenings while you're away. But don't leave it in a room that passers-by can see into when the light is on.
  • Ask a friend or neighbour to keep an eye on your home for you.
  • Check your building and contents insurance is up to date.

 

3 October 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Tim Watson (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nott)

Nottinghamshire County Council’s Trading Standards team have received reports of two vulnerable residents in the Borough of Gedling being targeted by cold callers claiming they needed guttering work carrying out. In both cases large sums of cash were demanded up front and in one case guttering was removed and fascias damaged. Both residents were persuaded to go to the bank to obtain cash.
Trading Standards never recommend employing a trader based on a cold call and we urge residents to be particularly wary of traders who knock at your door claiming that you need building work carrying out. If you are considering having work carried out on your property we suggest obtaining three quotes from reputable traders before entering into a contract. Where possible ask friends or family for recommendations of tradesmen. Alternatively you can contact Checkatrade for details of trades people who have demonstrated their commitment to fair and honest trading at www.checkatrade.com or by telephoning the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.
To report suspicious traders in your area, or to receive further advice, please phone the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06. If possible please note any registrations and details of vehicles.
A reputable trader will never ask you to go to the bank to obtain cash for payment and we strongly advise residents to refuse such a request. If you feel threatened or unable to say no to a trader please contact the Police immediately.

 

12 September 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

There is a phishing email currently in circulation that claims to be from the City of London Police. The departments that it claims to represent include the ‘Fraud Intelligence Unit’ and the ‘National Fraud Intelligence Bureau’. The email is titled ‘compensation fund’ and has a letter attachment that claims to be offering financial compensation to victims of fraud. The letter uses the City of London Police logo.  
The letter states that in order for compensation to be arranged, the receiver of the email should reply disclosing personal information. It states that HSBC and the South African Reserve Bank have been chosen to handle the compensation claims. All of these claims are false. 
The email and letter are fraudulent and should not be replied to. 
 
Protect Yourself 
•    Opening attachments or clicking links contained within emails from unknown sources could result in your device being infected with malware or a virus. 
•    The City of London Police and the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau will never email you asking for you to disclose personal information. 
•    If you believe you have become a victim of this fraudulent email get your device checked by a professional and make a report to Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre:  http://www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

12 September 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

This is to advise you that a shed has been broken into on South Scarle Road, Collingham.

This has occurred sometime between 28/08/16 and 11/09/16. Entry has been gained to the shed and a cycle stolen from within.

The crime ref is 499-11092016

Please contact the Police on 101 non-emergency number if you saw or heard anything suspicious that relates to this crime.

If you wish to remain anonymous you can call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111
 

12 September 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

This Alert is to advise you that a burglary has occurred at a property on Swinderby Road, Collingham.

This occurred sometime between 11am and 2pm on Sunday 11th September. Entry was gained be forcing a door. A selection of jewellery was taken. The crime ref is 460-11092016.

Please contact 101, if you saw or heard anything suspicious that relates to this crime. If you wish to remain anonymous you can also call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

We're asking residents to be vigilant and report anything you feel is suspicious to the Police straight away. 

You can call 999 if a crime is in progress or life is at risk or you can dial 101 the non-emergency number.
 

8 September 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Tim Watson (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nott)

We have received reports of a trader cold calling in the Collingham area and carrying out substandard roofing work. No company details were provided to the consumer.  
Trading Standards never recommend employing a trader based on a cold call.  If you are considering having work carried out on your property we suggest obtaining three quotes from reputable traders. We also recommend that you do not contract with a trader who does not or who is unwilling to provide a business name and contact details to allow you to contact them in the event that there are any problems with the work carried out. 
If you are suspicious of a cold caller operating in your area please contact Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.

 

1 September 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Seasonal rental fraud is an emerging trend with students looking for suitable accommodation around August, before the start of the new term. Fraudsters use a variety of websites to advertise available properties to rent, often at attractive rates and convenient locations. Adverts will seem genuine, accompanied by a number of photos and contact information to discuss your interest. 
Due to demand, students will often agree to pay upfront fees to secure the property quickly, without viewing the property, only to discover that the fraudster posing as the landlord does not have ownership of the property, or often there are already tenants living there. 
 
Protect Yourself
•    Only use reputable letting companies.
•    Do some online research such as using Google maps to check the property does exist.
•    Make an appointment to view the property in person. 
•    Always view the property prior to paying any advance fees.
•    Look out for warning signs, such as landlords requesting a ‘holding deposit’ due to the property being in high demand.
•    A landlord will usually conduct some due diligence on any successful applicant. Be wary of handing over cash without the landlord requesting employment or character references.

If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

22 August 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Students are being recruited, sometimes unwittingly, as “mules” by criminals to transfer illegally obtained money between different bank accounts.
 
What is a money mule?
A money mule is someone who is recruited by those needing to launder money obtained illegally. Criminals advertise fake jobs in newspapers and on the internet in a number of ways, usually offering opportunities to make money quickly, in order to lure potential money mule recruits. These include:
 
Social media posts
Copying genuine company’s websites to create impression of legitimacy
Sending mass emails offering employment
Targeting individuals that have posted their CVs on employment websites
 
Students are particularly susceptible to adverts of this nature. For someone in full-time education, the opportunity for making money quickly can understandably be an attractive one. The mule will accept money into their bank account, before following further instructions on what to do with the funds. Instructions could include transferring the money into a separate specified account or withdrawing the cash and forwarding it on via money transfer service companies like Western Union or MoneyGram. The mule is generally paid a small percentage of the funds as they pass through their account. 
 
Money Laundering is a criminal offence which can lead to prosecution and a custodial sentence. Furthermore, it can lead to the mule being unable to obtain credit in the UK and prevented from holding a bank account.
  
Protect Yourself
Be aware that the offence of money laundering carries a maximum prison sentence, in the UK, of 14 years.
Never give the details of your bank account to anyone that you do not trust.
No legitimate company will ever ask you to use your own bank account to transfer their money. Don’t accept any job offers that ask you to do this.
Be wary of unsolicited emails or social media posts promising ways of earning easy money. If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.
Don’t be afraid to question the legitimacy of any businesses that make you a job offer, especially if the recruitment procedure strays from the conventional. 

 

13 August 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Notts Police – Fire and Rescue and East Ambulance Service have collaborated together in creating the Pegasus data base helping individuals who have a disability, illness or vulnerability receive a swifter and effective service.
 Registering with Pegasus means emergency services can access details quickly, without having to ask for your name, address and phone number so you can immediately discuss why you are contacting a particular  emergency service.
 This service is not for everyone – Pegasus is primarily for individuals who have a disability, illness or vulnerability.
 For further information can be obtained via www.nottinghamshire.police.uk/pegasus or email pegasus@nottinghamshire.pnn.police.uk

 

11 August 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Online shopping websites are being utilised by fraudsters to advertise nonexistent drones of various specifications for competitive prices.

Drones are personal flying devices that often carry cameras and can be navigated remotely by smartphones or hand-held controllers. Fraudsters are capitalising on their recent popularity and advertising non-existent drones at a lower value than their recommended retail price to tempt buyers. 

After victims agree to purchase the drone, the fraudsters request payment to be paid via bank transfer saying that it will quicken the delivery process. After transferring the money the buyers never receive the drone and the fraudster blocks the victim to prevent further conversation. 

How to protect yourself: 
•    Check the validity of the post.
•    Avoid paying by bank transfer and instead use an online payment option such as PayPal, which helps to protect you.
•    Check feedback online by searching the associated phone numbers or email addresses of the seller. Feedback will give you useful information about recent transactions other buyers may have made.
•    If the item is below market value consider whether this is an opportunity too good to be true. 
•    If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

11 August 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

People selling their items on online platforms are falling victim to a new type of advance fee fraud. This involves a fraudster, posing as a buyer, sending an email to the seller (victim), agreeing to the full asking price of the item. They state that they are unable to collect the item themselves and will arrange for a courier to pick it up instead. 
 
The fraudster then sends a fake payment confirmation email from a different email address, one which falsely purports to be from a payment platform. In the course of the email exchange, the seller/victim is requested to pay the courier fee. Once the payment is made the contact is broken, the item is not picked up and the money paid for the ‘courier’ is gone. 
 
An example of the most recent emails received by the victim/seller, from the ‘Buyer’, read:
“I want you to consider this a deal as i am willing to pay your full asking price! i actually want to buy it for a family member who is urgently in need of it, i have checked through your posting and i'm fully satisfied with it. Unfortunately, i would not be able to come personally to view/collect, i work offshore as an instructor on a oil rig so i dont have time at all, but like i said i am 100% OK with the advert”
 
Protect Yourself: 
•    Be wary when buyers wish to purchase items at the full asking price without viewing them. 
•    Check the validity of the payment receipt confirmation
•    Avoid paying an advanced fee if you are a seller; should you choose to use a courier, arrange your own.
•    Check feedback online by searching the associated phone numbers or email addresses of the seller/buyer. Feedback will give you useful information about recent transactions other buyers/sellers have made.
•    If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

19 July 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

With summer holidays fast approaching, individuals are often more exposed to travel booking frauds when looking for last minute package deals / cheap flights. Whether paying upfront for a family holiday or simply booking a flight, payments are transferred only to discover that the holiday / airline ticket does not exist and was sold to you by a bogus travel company. Fraudsters will often lure in potential customers with low prices and ‘one time only’ offers that are simply too good to pass up, requesting payment by the preferred method of direct bank transfer.
 
Protect Yourself 
•    Avoid responding to unsolicited calls, texts or emails offering holidays at incredibly low prices.
•    Whenever possible, pay for your holiday by credit card as it offers increased protection.
•    Always remember to look for the ‘https’ and locked padlock icon in the address bar before entering your payment details.
•    Never feel pressured to make a booking for fear that you will miss out on this ‘low price’ opportunity. If you have never used the company before, take your time to do some online research to ensure they are reputable.
•    Should you make a flight or hotel booking through a travel company, feel free to separately check with the hotel / airline that your booking does indeed exist.

If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

15 July 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters are impersonating telephone service providers and contacting their clients offering a phone upgrade on a low monthly payment contract. The fraudsters will glean all your personal and financial details which will then be used to contact the genuine phone provider and order a new mobile phone handset. The fraudsters will either intercept the delivery before it reaches the victim’s address or order the handset to a different address.

Protect yourself 
•    Never provide your personal information to a third party from an unsolicited communication.
•    Obtain the genuine number of the organisation being represented and verify the legitimacy of the communication.
•    If the offer is too good to be true it probably is.
•    If you have provided personal information and you are concerned that your identity may be compromised consider Cifas Protection Registration.
If you have been a victim of fraud report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
 

1 July 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

Were you on Collingham High Street at around 3:00pm Friday 01/07/16. 

Offender(s) have entered a property located on the High Street. 

Did you see or hear anything? 

If you have any information regarding this incident please contact the Police on 101 or you can call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.
 

28 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro begin on 6th August 2016 and as of late June, you will be able to purchase tickets from the Rio 2016 ticket offices.  Purchasing from an unauthorised seller or a ticket tout could leave you out of pocket; not only are the tickets advertised at inflated prices, but there is also a risk that the tickets purchased are counterfeit or do not exist. Any individual with a counterfeit ticket will be refused entry. 
To help protect yourself, the list of authorised sellers has been published on the official website and provides a list of trusted resellers; this can be found at www.rio2016.com. Equally, tickets purchased that are no longer needed can be sold through the Rio 2016 website for a 100% reimbursement of the amount paid if the tickets are resold. 
Protect yourself 
•    When purchasing from another company or individual, ask questions; specifically when you will receive the ticket and what type of ticket you are purchasing. 
•    Pay for tickets by using a credit card or trusted payment service. Payments made by bank transfer may not be recoverable. 
•    Always check that the payment screen is secure by looking for the padlock symbol or making sure the website/url begins with “https”.
•    If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

27 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has noticed an increase in reports of fraudsters placing fake letter boxes on residential properties in an attempt to harvest the mail. Residents are sometimes unaware of the fake letterbox as the fraudsters will periodically remove the item, which may leave notable markings. The mail is then used to open various lines of credit with financial providers in the name of the innocent resident. 
Protect Yourself 
•    Be vigilant and check for any suspicious activity, tampering of your post/letterbox or for suspicious glue markings on the wall.
•    Check all post received from financial institutions, even if it appears unsolicited.
•    Consider reporting theft of mail to your local police force and any cases of identity fraud to Action Fraud.
•    If you have been a victim of identity fraud consider Cifas Protection Registration (https://www.cifas.org.uk/protective_registration_form)
•    If you, or anyone you know, has been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

24 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Online shopping websites are being utilised by fraudsters to advertise vehicles for sale which do not exist. After agreeing to purchase the vehicle via email with the fraudsters, buyers then receive emails purporting to be from Amazon Payments and/or Amazon Flexible Payment Service stating that their money will be held in an ‘escrow account’ (a bank account held by a third party, used as a temporary holding account during a transaction between two parties- for a 7 day ‘cooling off’ period). Once happy with the purchase the email indicates the money will be released to the seller, therefore offering ‘buyer protection’. In reality these emails are fraudulent and do not come from Amazon. The bank accounts are controlled by fraudsters. 
 
Protect yourself 
•    Remember that Amazon does not provide an escrow account to purchase items.
•    Meet the seller ‘face to face’ and view the vehicle before parting with any money. 
•    Be vigilant of emails that purport to be from genuine companies and check the ‘domain’ name of the email address for any inconsistencies. 
•    Check feedback online by searching the associated phone numbers or email addresses of the seller.
•    If the vehicle is below market value consider whether this is an opportunity too good to be true! 
•    If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

24 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Tim Watson (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nott)

Trading Standards have been notified of a business cold calling residents in the NG25 Southwell area claiming to have previously conducted driveway surfacing work at the property and claiming this now needs overlaying or re-spraying. The caller appears to be falsely claiming to represent another driveway business who do not cold call their customers.
Trading Standards never recommend employing a trader based on a cold call.  
 
If dealing with cold calling tradesmen we would recommend the following:
Do
•    Keep your front and back doors locked, even when you’re at home. Fix a security chain to your door, and make sure you use it every time someone calls.
•    If in doubt say "No thank you" and close the door. 
•    Make a note of any vehicle registrations or businesses names – ONLY IF IT IS SAFE TO DO SO
•    Report any cold callers via the Citizens Advice Consumer Helpline on 03454 04 05 06.
•    Phone the police if you feel in danger from the caller.
 
Don’t 
•    Let a caller into your home if you are unsure of them or they are a cold caller. 
•    Agree to have work done on your home without getting a second opinion or further quotes, two or three if possible. 
•    Be lured in by the promise of discounts, one-day only offers and ‘this deal is only available now’. 
•    Believe the ‘scare stories’ a seller may tell you – they are rarely true. 
•    Believe genuine companies have lots of left over products or cancelled orders.
•    Keep large sums of money in the home. 
We would advise that any householder who is considering having work done to their property should get quotes from at least three companies before agreeing to go ahead with any work, also speak to friends and relatives for recommendations.
 
If you need work carrying out you can contact Checkatrade for details of trades people who have demonstrated their commitment to fair and honest trading on www.checkatrade.com or through the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.
 
If you have agreed to a contract in your home you have cancellation rights, including a fourteen day cancellation period.  This is a right given to you by law.
 
To report suspicious traders in your area, or to receive further advice, please phone Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06. If possible please note any registrations and details of vehicles.

 

16 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Alex Hargreaves (Police, Fraud Investigator, Nottinghamshire)

Please look out;

Yesterday a person living in Nottingham was contacted by criminals claiming to be police officers from the Metropolitan Police Flying Squad. The victim was told that he there had been fraudulent activity on his account and that he needed to withdraw several thousand pounds in cash and give it to a courier in order to help catch the ‘criminals’. A courier took thousands of pounds from the victim and he was told to withdraw more money.
This is a type of fraud that has been used up and down the country and it is apparent that a gang is active in Nottingham at the moment.
 
Police will NEVER ask you to hand over money, bank cards or PIN numbers. 
 
If someone identifies themselves as a police officer to you in person, ask to see their identification. You can check their details by calling 101 and asking the operator to confirm the officer’s details.
If someone calls you on the phone claiming to be a police officer get their details and call them back through the police switchboard by dialling 101.
No genuine officer will ever refuse to show you ID or refuse to let you confirm their identity. 
 
If you are not sure that a person at your doorstep is a police officer close your door and call 999.
 
If you think that you have been targeted by a person on the phone claiming to be a police officer hang up and report it by calling 101 or online at actionfraud.police.uk 
 
If you would like any further help or advice on preventing cyber-crime and fraud please call Nottinghamshire Police on 101 or get regularly updated advice by visiting www.nottinghamshire.police.uk/advice and http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

If you have information about any crime or see anyone acting suspiciously in your area please call Nottinghamshire Police on 101 or anonymously via Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

In an emergency, for example where life is in danger or a crime is in progress please call 999
 

13 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

A new phishing campaign which has hit students of UK universities claims that the student has been awarded an educational grant by the Department for Education. The email purports to have come from the finance department of the student’s university and tricks the recipient into clicking on a link contained in the message to provide personal and banking details. 
One victim reported that after submitting their sensitive information (including name, address, date of birth, contact details, telephone provider, bank account details, student ID, National Insurance Number, driving licence number and mother’s maiden name), they were taken to a spoofed website which appeared like a genuine website of their bank, where they were asked to type in their online banking login credentials.

Protect Yourself: 
•    Do not click on any links or open attachments contained within unsolicited emails.
•    Do not reply to scam emails or contact the senders in any way. 
•    If an email appears to have come from a person or organisation you know of but the message is unexpected or unusual, contact them directly via another method to confirm that they sent you the email.
•    If you receive an email which asks you to login to an online account via a link provided in the email, instead of clicking on the link, open your browser and go directly to the company’s website yourself.
•    If you have clicked on a link in the email, do not supply any information on the website that may open.

If you think you may have compromised the safety of your bank details and/or have lost money due to fraudulent misuse of your cards, you should immediately contact your bank, and report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

10 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Businesses are being contacted for the sale of goods or services by fraudsters, who request to pay by cheque. The fraudster sends a cheque with a higher value than the amount expected, and then sends the business a request for the difference with instructions on how it should be paid back. This is usually by bank transfer or through a money transfer service, such as Western Union or PaySafe. Once the ‘refund’ has been provided, it is realised that the cheque provided was fraudulent and no funds are credited to the business’s account.
The NFIB has seen an increase of 84% in the number of counterfeit cheque frauds reported to Action Fraud since November 2015. Criminals are targeting a wide range of services including paintings or other artwork, photography and lessons, with various amounts requested to be refunded.  The average amount requested to be refunded is £1,818. The highest amount requested was over £80,000.
The suspects have used pressure tactics to persuade victims to refund the amounts immediately prior to the cheques clearing.
  
Crime Prevention Advice 
•    Be cautious of payments where the amount provided is higher than expected. Refuse to provide the service unless the correct balance is received or wait until the cheque has cleared before refunding the difference. 
•    Always contact banks on a trusted number found on their website or correspondence that is known to be authentic to confirm whether the cheque has cleared. 
•    Do not feel pressured to provide a refund before the cheque has cleared.
 
If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

8 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The 2016 European Football Championships will begin shortly and those wanting to purchase last minute tickets are likely to be targeted by fraudsters posing as official sellers.  Purchasing from an unauthorised seller or a ticket tout could leave you out of pocket; not only are the tickets advertised at inflated prices, there is a risk that the tickets purchased are counterfeit or do not exist. Any individual with a counterfeit ticket will be refused entry.
 
Resale Platform
Consumers wanting to sell their tickets can do so through the resale platform, where tickets will be resold at face value. For further information please visit UEFA’s website. Those seeking to purchase tickets are advised to check the site regularly as tickets will be sold on a first come first serve basis and are likely to change regularly as different tickets become available to purchase. 
•    Only purchase tickets from an authorised seller by using the exchange portal.
•    When using the portal do not be encouraged to contact the seller privately and complete the transaction outside of the portal. 
•    Be wary of purchasing tickets from a social media account. There is a risk that the ticket does not exist or is counterfeit. Consider conducting research on the information provided by the seller, for example a mobile phone number or email address used by the seller could alert you to any negative information associated to them online.
•    Avoid making payments through bank transfer or money transfer services, as the payment may not be recoverable. 
 
If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.

 

4 June 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

Between 3-4/6/16 a Stable Yard and Horse Boxes have been broken into and a number of Tack Items have been stolen. 

The yard is located in Brough, Newark. 

If you have any information about this incident please contact the Police on 101 quoting Incident 270-04062016
 

19 May 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

14:52pm 19/05/2016 a property has been broken into in the Farndon area of Newark. 
Offenders have left the property taking a Blue BMW 3 series KN63YXW from the driveway. 

Were you in the area at the time or have you seen the BMW. Any information 101 and quote Incident 446-19052016. 
 

17 May 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

Incident 359 of 16/05/16 relates to a break in to an outbuilding in Harby, Notts. 

Power Tools and Gardening Equipment were stolen. 

The incident took place between 9am-12pm. 

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Nottinghamshire Police on 101. 

Thank You 
 

17 May 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Michael Munro (Police, PCSO 8128, Newark Rural South (Farndon))

Between 0830-1600 on Monday 16/05/2016 four cycles were stolen from a secure shed located on Low Street in Collingham, Notts. Did you see or hear anything. Any information 101 quoting Incident 654-16052016

 

9 May 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Tim Watson (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nott)

We have received reports of a trader approaching residents falsely claiming to be working for Nottinghamshire County Council Highways Department and offering to carry out driveway maintenance work.
Nottinghamshire County Council Highways Department would never approach individual homes offering to carry out driveway maintenance work.
Trading Standards never recommend employing a trader based on a cold call.
We would advise that any householder who is considering having work done to their property should get quotes from at least three companies before agreeing to go ahead with any work, also speak to friends and relatives for recommendations.
If you need work carrying out you can contact Checkatrade for details of trades people who have demonstrated their commitment to fair and honest trading on www.checkatrade.com or through the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.
If you have agreed to a contract in your home you have cancellation rights, including a fourteen day cancellation period.  This is a right given to you by law.
To report suspicious traders in your area, or to receive further advice, please phone Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06. If possible please note any registrations and details of vehicles.

 

4 May 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) and Action Fraud have noticed a rise in the reporting of pets, and in particular puppies and kittens, being advertised for sale via popular online auction websites. The fraudsters will place an advert of the pet for sale, often claiming that the pet is currently held somewhere less accessible or overseas. Upon agreement of a sale, the suspect will usually request an advance payment by money transfer or bank transfer. However, the pet does not materialise and the fraudster will subsequently ask for further advanced payments for courier charges, shipping fees and additional transportation costs. Even if further payments are made, the pet will still not materialise as it is likely that the pet does not exist.

Protect Yourself:
•    Stay within auction guidelines. 
•    Be cautious if the seller initially requests payment via one method, but later claims that due to ‘issues with their account’ they will need to take the payment via an alternative method such as a bank transfer. 
•    Consider conducting research on other information provided by the seller, for example a mobile phone number or email address used by the seller could alert you to any negative information associated with the number/email address online.  
•    Request details of the courier company being used and consider researching it.
•    Agree a suitable time to meet face to face to agree the purchase and to collect the pet. If the seller is reluctant to meet then it could be an indication that the pet does not exist. 
•    A genuine seller should be keen to ensure that the pet is going to a caring and loving new home. If the seller does not express any interest in you and the pet’s new home, be wary. 
•    If you think the purchase price is too good to be true then it probably is, especially if the pet is advertised as a pure-breed.
•    Do not be afraid to request copies of the pet’s inoculation history, breed paperwork and certification prior to agreeing a sale. If the seller is reluctant or unable to provide this information it could be an indication that either the pet does not exist or the pet has been illegally bred e.g. it originates from a ‘puppy farm’. A ‘puppy farm’ is a commercial dog breeding enterprise where the sole aim is to maximise profit for the least investment. Commercial dog breeders must be registered with their local authority and undergo regular inspections to ensure that the puppies are bred responsibly and are in turn fit and healthy. Illegally farmed puppies will often be kept in inadequate conditions and are more likely to suffer from ailments and illnesses associated with irresponsible breeding. 
•    When thinking of buying a pet, consider buying them in person from rescue centres or from reputable breeders
If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

29 April 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Within the past 24 hours a number of businesses throughout the UK have received extortion demands from a group calling themselves ‘Lizard Squad’. 
 Method of Attack:
The group have sent emails demanding payment of 5 Bitcoins, to be paid by a certain time and date. The email states that this demand will increase by 5 Bitcoins for each day that it goes unpaid. 
If their demand is not met, they have threatened to launch a Denial of Service attack against the businesses’ websites and networks, taking them offline until payment is made.   
The demand states that once their actions have started, they cannot be undone.
What to do if you’ve received  one of these demands: 
•    Report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or by using the online reporting tool
•    Do not pay the demand
•    Retain the original emails (with headers)
•    Maintain a timeline of the attack, recording all times, type and content of the contact
If you are experiencing a DDoS right now you should: 
•    Report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 immediately.
•    Call your Internet Service Provider (ISP) (or hosting provider if you do not host your own Web server), tell them you are under attack and ask for help.
•    Keep a timeline of events and save server logs, web logs, email logs, any packet capture, network graphs, reports etc.
Get Safe Online top tips for protecting your business from a DDoS: 
•    Consider the likelihood and risks to your organisation of a DDoS attack, and put appropriate threat reduction/mitigation measures in place.
•    If you consider that protection is necessary, speak to a DDoS prevention specialist.
•    Whether you are at risk of a DDoS attack or not, you should have the hosting facilities in place to handle large, unexpected volumes of website hits.

 

26 April 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) and Action Fraud have noticed a rise in the reporting of victims being recruited via Facebook to sell items for suspects on eBay – often stating that it is a quick way of making money.

The items are said to be bankrupt stock, purchased via auctions, and need to be sold on quickly. The majority of the items reported have been Apple Mac Book Pro/Electrical Items.

The victim places the items on eBay and once the items are sold, the victim will get paid and transfer the funds to the suspect/recruiter.

Once the suspect/recruiter gets the funds, the purchasers are claiming that they have received empty cereal boxes or often no goods at all, leaving the victim being reported as the actual suspect, and leaving them out of pocket as their account will be debited.

Protect yourself: 
•    Consider conducting research on other information provided by the seller, for example: a mobile phone number or email address could alert you to negative information associated with the number/email address online.  
•    Be very cautious of unsolicited emails or approaches over social media promising opportunities to make easy money. 
•    When accepting offers, verify the company/entity details provided to you and check whether they have been registered in the UK. 
•    If you think the deal or offer is too good to be true then it probably is!  
 If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

23 April 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters are texting members of the public offering a tax rebate. The text message contains a link to a website and requests to provide personal information, such as bank account information, to claim the nonexistent rebate. 

Protect Yourself 
•    Don’t click on web links contained in unsolicited texts or emails.
•    Never provide your personal information to a third party from an unsolicited communication.
•    Obtain the genuine number of the organisation being represented and verify the legitimacy of the communication.
•    HMRC will never use texts or emails or tell you about a potential rebate or ask for personal information.
•    If you have provided personal information and you are concerned that your identity may be compromised consider Cifas Protection Registration.
 

22 April 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

A new investment fraud trend is targeting members of the public who are seeking to sell their wine investment.  Fraudsters agree to purchase the victim’s wine, but instead transfer the stock into their own account without paying the victim.  The fraudulently obtained wine is then believed to be sold on to other, unsuspecting victims.  
 
How does it work?
Fraudsters set up fake companies and websites as well as exploit the names of legitimate, established companies to facilitate this fraud.  They cold-call the victims and offer to purchase their wine for significantly more than the actual market value.  
 
Fraudulent documents, such as purchase agreements, are used to facilitate the fraud and are sent to the victims via post and email.  Some fraudsters have gone as far as setting up fake escrow services in order to fool the potential sellers that the payments have been transferred.    
 
The fraudsters send the victims instructions to transfer their wine into storage accounts held within legitimate bonded warehouses.  The victims are informed that upon doing this they will be paid the agreed amount.  The use of storage accounts held within legitimate bonded warehouses adds an air of legitimacy to the process but in actual fact these storage accounts are controlled by the fraudsters.      
 
Once the wine is transferred into the new storage accounts the suspects break off all contact with the victims.  The wine is then moved again, normally within days and often abroad, and, needless to say, the victim never receives the money from the agreed sale.

Protect Yourself
  
•    Never respond to unsolicited phone calls – if in doubt, hang up
•    Always check that the details of the organisation or company contacting you (such as website, address and phone number) are correct – the fraudsters may be masquerading as a legitimate organisation
•    Never sign over your wine (or any other investment) to another party without first checking they are authentic
•    Don’t be fooled by a professional looking website, as the cost of creating a professional website is easily affordable
•    Escrow services are regulated by the FCA under the Payment Services Directive 2009.  Only deal with a registered Authorised Payment Institution.  You can check the FCA register online at www.fca.org.uk/register
•    Consider seeking independent legal and/or financial advice before making a decision
•    If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

20 April 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

James Delaney (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nottinghamshire)

Nottinghamshire County Council Trading Standards are warning people to beware of bogus telephone calls purporting to be from the Citizen’s Advice Bureau.

Officers are issuing the warning as reports have been made by Nottinghamshire residents stating that they have been cold called by someone claiming to be from the Citizen’s Advice Bureau. The callers said they had called to discuss the consumer’s debt. When the resident asked for more details and challenged the legitimacy of the call the person hung up. 

From our experience we believe it is likely that the caller would have attempted to extract money or personal/bank details from the resident.

Nottinghamshire County Council advice is not to answer any personal questions during cold calls and to end the call immediately. If you believe the caller may be legitimate, you will be able to call the company back using their publicly available telephone number. They should hold a record of the person you spoke to and the reason they had cause to call which will help to determine whether or not the contact is genuine.  

The Consumer Advice Bureau have informed us that they would never cold call any resident. If you do receive a call from someone claiming to be from The Citizen’s Advice Bureau and you have not had any recent dealings with them, ask for their full name and a telephone number and say you’ll contact them back. If the caller is bogus they are likely hang up without giving you
any details.

If the bogus callers have given you information which may help trace them, please report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or visit http://www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

20 April 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has recently received an influx of reports that fraudsters are targeting the public, via social media, in relation to football tickets.
 
Fraudsters are posting pictures or statuses online telling members of the public to contact them via Direct Message for football tickets. This then leads to a mobile messaging conversation. During the conversation, bank details are provided by the suspect so that the tickets can be purchased.
 
After the victim has paid for the ticket the fraudster blocks them to stop further conversation, leaving victims without the tickets and out of pocket. 
 
Protect yourself: 
•    Check the security of the website and validity of the post 
•    Avoid taking the conversation offline to private messages
•    When purchasing any products over the internet always try to make the payment via PayPal or a credit card where you have some sort of payment cover
 
If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.
 

11 April 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters are targeting members of the public who are expecting to make a payment for property repairs. The fraudsters, via email, will purport to be a tradesman who has recently completed work at the property and use a similar email address to that of the genuine tradesman. They will ask for funds to be transferred via bank transfer and once payment is made the victims of the fraud soon realise they have been deceived when the genuine tradesman requests payment for their services.

Protect Yourself: 
•    Always check the email address is exactly the same as previous correspondence with the genuine contact. 
•    For any request of payment via email verify the validity of the request with a phone call to the person who carried out the work.
•    Check the email for spelling and grammar as these signs can indicate that the email is not genuine.
•    Payments via bank transfer offer no financial protection; consider using alternative methods such as a credit card or PayPal which offer some protection and avenue for recompense.
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online at:  http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone on: 0300 123 2040.
 

1 April 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

This alert is a reminder to be aware of emails that appear to have been sent from a legitimate organisation. Fraudsters often use fake email addresses designed to encourage recipients to open attachments or links. You are advised that if you are in any doubt as to the origin of an email, do not open it. Consider that emails can be spoofed and used to generate spam to recipients far and wide. If you receive a spam email, you MUST NOT open it. Instead, delete it from your email system to avoid infecting your device. If you have opened an attachment from a spam email, you should get your device checked over by a professional and change the passwords for all your bank, email and online shopping accounts.
 
Protect yourself: 
•    Do not click or open unfamiliar links in emails or on websites.
•    Make sure you install and use up-to-date anti-virus software. 
•    Have a pop-up blocker running in the background of your web browser.
•    If you have opened an attachment and ‘enabled macros’ it is very likely that all your personal data will have been breached. You MUST change all your passwords for personal accounts, including your bank accounts.
•    Ensure Adobe, Flash and any similar software is up to date on your computer.
 
If you think you have been a victim of this type of email you should report the email to Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre: www.actionfraud.police.uk If you do make a report please provide as much detail as you can about the email and any effects it has had on your computer. Additionally if your Anti-Virus software detects any issues in relation to this email please provide us with the details. 

 

24 March 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

As the Easter holidays are almost upon us and some will be out enjoying the long weekend or even going away, we would like to remind local residents of some simple crime prevention steps to help secure your home.

Most burglaries are opportunistic, if a window or door is left insecure this is seen as an easy way to enter a house.  Did you know that 1 in 3 burglaries in Nottinghamshire are via an insecurity?

If you are out in the evenings or going away, make sure home appears occupied.  Use timers on lamps and leave a radio on to give the impression that someone is home. You might even choose to invest in a TV simulator to use in an upstairs room.

Make sure your doors are locked even when home is occupied.  NEVER leave keys in window or door locks – this frequently HELPS offenders. Car or house keys should never be visible from outside.

Did you know that you can register belongings, safely and securely, free of charge database on Website www.Immobilise.com. You can register absolutely anything that is valuable to you using a photo and description. If you are burgled or lose items, not only will have a greater chance of being reunited with your property, but can also help with prosecuting offenders. The systems works by allowing Police officers access the system when they deal with lost property or items believed to have been stolen. If you have previously registered this item as belonging to you then we can identify yourself as the lawful owner.

And finally if you are going away at all over the holidays and have a burglar alarm, make sure it is set!

Taking just a few steps to protect your property can make all the difference in preventing a thief getting into your homes.

Please see Holiday Checklist for more information should you be heading off for the Easter break.
 

21 March 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Residents in Nottinghamshire are being warned about a scam lotto win letter that is arriving through the post.

Always remember : 
•    You cannot win a competition you did not enter!
•    You should never have to pay a "release fee" to claim your prize
•    If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is!

Please see link which is a copy of an actual letter received by a Nottinghamshire resident, addressed to the recipient personally.  We have blanked out their details for Data Protection purposes.

Please share this message to raise awareness.
 

15 March 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Richard Brown (Police, Senior Digital Officer, Notts)

Free text message alerts now available in your area

People in rural areas of Bassetlaw, Newark and Sherwood can now receive free news, information and appeals from police in their area straight to their mobile phone, thanks to a new text messaging pilot being launched by Nottinghamshire Police.
  
What information will I receive?
The pilot – which has been funded by the Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Paddy Tipping – will enable our officers to reach thousands of people living and working in their area to share information about: 
•    Recent incidents in their area
•    Advice to help avoid them becoming a victim of crime
•    What’s being done to tackle rural crime in their area
 
How much does it cost?
It is completely free to sign-up to start receiving alerts by both email and text message.
  
What information will I receive?
You can change your preferences at any time, giving you complete control over what information you receive and how you receive it. You can also unsubscribe at any time.
  
How to register - and opt out
If you've already told us you'd like to receive information by text message, there's nothing you need to do - but if you want to be sure you're registered, simply login to let us know you'd like to start receiving alerts from officers in your area by text message.

If you'd like to opt out altogether, you can login using the above link to update your preferences about what kind of information you receive.
 

4 March 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Tim Watson (Trading Standards, Trading Standards Officer, Nottinghamshire County Council)

Nottinghamshire residents are being warned about door-to-door fish salesmen who are visiting residents and trying to persuade them to buy fish.
Residents are presented with fish that is largely unlabelled and some of which is unfit to eat.
This type of scam involving door to door fish sales is a growing national problem. We advise that the best place to buy fish is from a reputable fishmonger at an established shop or stall.
Doorstep sellers also tend not to offer customers cancellation rights or provide a receipt to allow them to seek a refund if they are not satisfied with the goods.
Anyone who has been approached by fish sellers in this manner should contact the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.
 

2 March 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud has received several reports in the last 24 hours from businesses who have been sent online extortion demands from scammers threatening a cyber attack. 

The scammers, who call themselves the “RepKiller Team”, have been sending emails to businesses across the UK demanding payment of between £300-£500 in Bitcoins by a certain date and time. 

If the demands are not met, the team have threatened to launch a cyber attack against the businesses and their reputation by automating hundreds of negative reviews online. 

The emails also claim that once actions have started, they cannot be undone. Although these scammers are currently calling themselves “RepKiller”, it is common for fraudsters to continually change and adopt new tactics – email names can be made and changed easily.

What to do if you receive one of these emails? 
•    Whether the attack is attempted or successful, you should report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or by using our online reporting tool 
•    Do not pay the demand. There is no guarantee the scammers won’t launch an attack and could encourage further extortion demands in the future.  
•    Retain all the original emails. Should law enforcement investigate, the information contained within the email headers can be used as evidence. 
•    Maintain a timeline of the attack recording all times, type and content of contact.
 

22 February 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud has been receiving reports of an advanced fee fraud whereby suspects phone a member of the public and claim to be calling on behalf of the UK (or British) Government Grant Department.

They go on to state that the individual has won a Good Citizen Award – of typically £8,000 – and that the grant can be released for a fee (of around £210).
Fortunately, very few members of the public have lost any money as a result of this scam but have reported to Action Fraud in order to help build a picture of this fraud and protect others from falling victim to it.

Protect yourself: 
•    There is no genuine ‘Good Citizen Award’ scheme in the UK that operates by cold calling “winners” and asking for an upfront fee to release a grant. 
•    If you receive a call that claims to represent such a scheme, it is a scam. End the phone call – do not give out any personal or financial data.
If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

19 February 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

This is an update to a previous alert sent from Action Fraud in November 2015.

Fraudsters are setting up high specification websites advertising various electrical goods and domestic appliances. These goods are below market value and do not exist. The website will state you can pay via card; however when the purchaser goes to pay, this option is not available and the payment must be made via bank transfer. 

The fraudster entices the purchaser and reassures them it is a legitimate purchase by using the widely recognised Trusted Shop Trustmark. They then use the Trustmark fraudulently and provide a link on the bogus electrical website to another bogus website (which purports to be Trusted Shops). This website shows a fake certificate purporting to be from Trusted Shops and provides thousands of reviews for the bogus electrical website. These reviews are all fraudulent. The website has not been certified by Trusted Shops and therefore the purchaser is not covered by the Trusted Shop money-back guarantee. 

Protect yourself: 
•    Check the authenticity of the website before making any purchases. Conduct a ‘Whois’ search on the website which will identify when the website has been created- Be wary of newly formed domains. You can conduct this search using the following website – https://who.is/
•    Conduct online research in relation to the website, company name and the business address provided to identify any poor feedback or possible irregularities. 
•    Check the Trusted Shops Facebook page where warnings about websites using their Trustmark are published. If you are in doubt about the legitimacy of a Trustmark then you can contact Trusted Shops on 0203 364 5906 or by email service@trustedshops.co.uk. They will confirm whether they have certified that website. 
•    Payments made via bank transfer are not protected should you not receive the item. Therefore always try to make the payment via PayPal or a credit card where you have some payment cover should you not receive your product. 
•    If the item advertised seems too good to be true, then it probably is.  

If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

5 February 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

In December 2015 the UK was hit by three severe storms resulting in widespread flooding across the North of England and Scotland.
 
The NFIB would like to make flood victims aware of the possible threat that Rogue Traders and Bogus Trades People pose to them. Buying on your doorstep can be convenient. However, a salesman who uses clever tactics can pressurise you into buying something you actually don’t want or something that’s poor value for money.
 
Protect yourself against bogus trades people fraud 
•    Always ask for identification before letting anyone you don't know into your house.
•    Check credentials, including a permanent business address and landline telephone number. The mobile phone numbers given on business cards are often pay-as-you-go numbers which are virtually impossible to trace.
•    Take control by asking the questions. Ask for references from previous customers or to see examples of their work.
•    Don’t sign on the spot – shop around. Get at least three written quotes to make sure you’re not being ripped off.
•    If in any doubt, ask the person to leave or call the Citizens Advice consumer helpline on 03454 04 05 06.
 
If you do decide to buy: 
•    Always get any agreement you make in writing.
•    Beware when filling in forms or when speaking to the salesperson, and ensure you don’t reveal confidential details that a fraudster could use to assume your identity or take control of your finances. This may allow a fraudster to steal money from your account or order goods and services in your name.
•    Usually, you have a seven-day cooling off period. So if you decide to cancel the contract, act fast.
•    Think very carefully about having any work done or goods delivered during the cooling off period. You may have to pay, even if you change your mind.
•    Never pay for work before it has been completed, and only then if you are happy with it.
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040

 

1 February 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters are sending out virus infected emails that claim a package has been seized by HM Revenue & Customs upon arrival into the United Kingdom. The official looking scam emails claiming to be from Royal Mail contain a link to a document which will install malicious software on your computer designed to steal credentials like account names, email addresses and passwords. 
 
An example email reads:
 
Title: Your parcel has been seized
Royal Mail is sorry to inform you that a package addressed to you was seized by HM Revenue & Customs upon arrival into the United Kingdom.
A close inspection deemed your items as counterfeit and the manufacturers have been notified. If your items are declared genuine then they will be returned back to you with the appropriate custom charges.
You may have been a victim of counterfeit merchandise and the RM Group UK will notify you on how to get your money back. Please review the attached PDF document for more information. 
Document (RM7002137GB).Zip
Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience this may have caused.
 
To help the spread of the virus, the email also says: “you will need to have access to a computer to download and open the Zip file”. If you receive one of these emails, do not click on any links or download any attachments and report it to Action Fraud. 
 
Protect Yourself 
•    Royal Mail will never send an email asking for credit card numbers or other personal or confidential information.
•    Royal Mail will never ask customers to enter information on a page that isn’t part of the Royal Mail website.
•    Royal Mail will never include attachments unless the email was solicited by a customer e.g. customer has contacted Royal Mail with an enquiry or has signed up for updates from Royal Mail.
•    Royal Mail have also stressed that they do not receive a person’s email address as part of any home shopping experience. 
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone: 0300 123 2040

 

28 January 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) is warning people of the dangers of Recovery Room fraudsters targeting former victims of Timeshare fraud.
Recovery Room Fraud refers to a scam whereby fraudsters contact the victims of previous frauds, often by way of cold calling them, and claim to be able to recover previously lost funds. In July 2014 the Financial Services Authority (FSA) estimated that 30% of people who had lost money through Investment fraud would also fall victim to a Recovery Room fraud.

When Recovery Room fraudsters target victims of timeshare frauds they usually claim to be a legal professional or a representative of a government agency (normally within the country where the original timeshare property was based) in order to legitimise the scam. The fraudsters know personal details about the victim and their previous investment which gives them credibility. They claim that the advanced fees requested are for ‘local taxes’ or ‘litigation costs’ incurred during the recovery of the funds. It is suspected that the persons behind Recovery Room frauds are often the same people involved in the original scams even though these crimes may have occurred years earlier.

Initially, a small fee, typically in the region of £200-400, is requested by the fraudsters which they often claim is refundable as part of a ‘no-win no-fee’ basis.  The fraudsters rely on the victims seeing this as a nominal fee compared to the amounts lost, which often run into the tens-of-thousands of pounds, and therefore worth paying if it facilitates the return of their money. Once paid, various excuses are made by the fraudsters to explain delays in the recovery of the funds.  Subsequently, further larger amounts are then requested by the fraudsters.  Needless to say, no refunds ever materialise and no money is ever recovered. 
  
Protect Yourself
•    Never respond to unsolicited phone calls – if in doubt, hang up.
•    Always check that the details of the organisation or company contacting you (such as website, address and phone number) are correct – the fraudsters may be masquerading as a legitimate organisation.
•    Don’t be fooled by a professional looking website as nowadays the cost of creating a professional website is easily affordable.
•    Be wary of any firms or individuals asking for advanced fees.
•    Consider seeking independent legal and/or financial advice before making a decision.
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone: 0300 123 2040
 

21 January 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Nottinghamshire Police would like to bring to your attention a publication called 'Digital Parenting'

Digital Parenting is a publication by The Vodafone Foundation. It aims to provide parents with useful information to help them understand the latest technology, parental controls and features available to help keep youngsters safe online.

The publication is available online here http://vodafonedigitalparenting.co.uk/

There is a wealth of information ranging including setting parental controls, recommended apps, cyber bullying and guidance in relation to online activities and their impact.

This is a great read if you have your own children indeed if you work with youngsters. 
 

21 January 2016

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Fraudsters are sending out virus infected emails that claim a package has been seized by HM Revenue & Customs upon arrival into the United Kingdom.

The official looking scam emails claiming to be from Royal Mail contain a link to document which will install malicious software on your computer designed to steal credentials like account names, email addresses and passwords etc. 
An example email reads
Title: Your parcel has been seized

Royal Mail is sorry to inform you that a package addressed to you was seized by HM Revenue & Customs upon arrival into the United Kingdom.

A close inspection deemed your items as counterfeit and the manufacturers have been notified. If your items are declared genuine then they will be returned back to you with the appropriate custom charges.

You may have been a victim of counterfeit merchandise and the RM Group UK will notify you on how to get your money back. Please review the attached PDF document for more information. 

Document (RM7002137GB).Zip

Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience this may have caused.

The help the spread of the virus, the emails also says: “you will need to have access to a computer to download and open the Zip file”. 

If you receive one of these emails, do not click on any links or download any attachments and report it to ActionFraud.

Advice from Royal Mail on scam emails and how they contact you 
•    Royal Mail will never send an email asking for credit card numbers or other personal or confidential information.
•    Royal Mail will never ask customers to enter information on a page that isn’t part of the Royal Mail website.
•    Royal Mail will never include attachments unless the email was solicited by customer e.g. customer has contacted Royal Mail with an enquiry or has signed up for updates from Royal Mail.
•    Royal Mail have also stressed that they do not receive a person’s email address as part of any home shopping experience.
SEE ORIGINAL PRESS RELEASE HERE :
http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/news/alert-your-package-has-been-seized-royal-mail-scam-emails-jan16

Please feel free to share this information to spread the word.
 

22 December 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Recent events around the world remind us all of the terrorist threat we face, which in the UK is considered as ‘SEVERE’, meaning an attack is highly likely. Police and security agencies are working tirelessly to protect the public but it is also important that communities remain vigilant and aware of how to protect themselves if the need arises.

The four minute film, Stay Safe: Firearms and Weapons Attack sets out three key steps for keeping safe. The film is accompanied by an online information leaflet. 

The film and leaflet advise that if you are caught up in an incident to ‘run, hide and tell’ - guidance which can be applied to many places and situations. 

Link to video and advice page :
http://www.npcc.police.uk/NPCCBusinessAreas/WeaponAttacksStaySafe.aspx 

REMEMBER :
Run: Run to a place of safety.  This is a far better option than to surrender or negotiate.  if there's no were to go then...

Hide: It's better to hide than to confront.  Remember to turn your phone to silent and turn of vibrate.  Barircade yourself in if you can.  Then finally and only when it is safe to do so....

Tell: Tell the Police by calling 999

 

15 December 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Link to our seasonal crime prevention advice aimed to reduce opportunity for crime and to help keep you, your loved ones, and your possessions free from crime.
 
Please remember to make sure that home looks occupied when you are out and about.  Please don't leave presents under the tree if they can be seen through windows and doors - yes they look great, but sadly we have already taken reports of a number of burglaries where gifts have been stolen from under trees.

Always make sure that your doors and windows are secure, even when there is someone at home. Also, please never leave keys in locks as these can assist an offender!
 
Ensure that gadgets and items of value are registered on www.immobilise.com and that mobile technology has appropriate safety settings for youngsters, and also activate or install tracking apps in case of loss or theft.
 
If you have any questions at all on crime prevention or security, please feel free to call us on 101 extn 800 3011 or email crime.prevention@nottinghamshire.pnn.police.uk
 

8 December 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Please follow the two links below for:

The NottsWatch Christmas Newsletter
and Nottinghamshire Police are seeking to recruit RURAL SPECIAL CONSTABLES

 

30 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

There has been a recent series of incidents whereby fraudsters either phone or attend the home address of elderly members of the public, claiming to be police officers.

The fake officer/s will claim that they are investigating a fraud which they believe the elderly person to be a victim of. The fake officer/s will then request the bank cards and personal identification numbers (PIN) of the victim and claim these are needed for investigation purposes. If the first contact was made by a phone call, the fake officer/s will tell the victim that someone will be over to collect the evidence. In one case the victim was instructed to attend their local bank and withdraw all of the money from their account. The suspect was left alone in the victim’s house whilst the victim carried out the instructions.
 
Protect Yourself 
•    Before letting anyone into your home who claims to be from any law enforcement agency, ask to see their identity card and check it by calling 101.
•    Ask if they can attend at a pre-arranged time when a family member or friend can also be present.
•    If you receive a phone call from a police officer,  ask for their name and force and tell them you will call them back. Wait a few minutes and then use 101 to call them back through their force’s switchboard and verify their identity.
•    The Police will never ask for your PIN or passwords. Do not give this information to anyone.
•    The Police will never request that you withdraw/transfer any money to them.
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

26 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Last Christmas individuals and businesses reported losing £16,426,989 to online fraudsters through online shopping and auction fraud[1]. This is a 42% increase in total financial loss compared with the 2013 festive period where £9,522,491 was lost by victims.
 
Last year’s report shows that the most common time for victims to initially make contact with the fraudster was on 28 November- Black Friday (221 victims) and 1 December - Cyber Monday (205 victims), as people head online to try and bag the best festive bargains out there. This serves as a warning to consumers to be extra vigilant on these key Christmas shopping days as online fraudsters are watching and waiting to capitalise on the biggest shopping frenzies of the year. 
 
The most common item being bought and sold by victims and fraudsters were mobile phones. People reported trying to get good deals on some of the most popular models of smart phones, but what they thought was going to be a bargain never actually arrived leaving them without presents to give on Christmas day. Others reported being defrauded whilst trying to buy footwear, clothing, watches, gaming consoles, computers, furniture and home electricals. 
 
Action Fraud and Get Safe Online have launched a national fraud prevention campaign which will be supported by police forces across the country. 
 
The aim is to provide practical fraud and cyber crime protection tips which aim to prevent people from getting conned out of the Christmas that they deserve.
 
Nottinghamshire Police will be supporting this campaign via social media and sending advice out via Nottinghamshire Alert
[1] Figures in the above release refer to Online Shopping and Auction Fraud reports made to Action Fraud during the Christmas period (1 November 2014- 28 February 2015). The month of January and February 2015 have been included to account for any delays in reporting incidences.
 
Online Shopping Advice
Christmas is one of the most common times to get defrauded online 
•    20 factors you should check on a website before you enter your card details.  Click here for a great interactive tour to learn more! http://www.buyagift.co.uk/Content/design/infographics/howtotrustawebsite/how-to-trust-a-website.html
 
•    Always check payment pages are secure and log out when you’ve finished shopping online 
Visit GetSafeOnline for more information https://www.getsafeonline.org/shopping-banking/online-payments/ 
 
Auction Fraud 
•    Before buying on auction sites always check whether the seller or buyer is genuine – check their feedback and selling history before you commit to buying – and make sure that the offer isn’t too good to be true!
 
•    People were defrauded most last year when trying to buy mobile phones. Remember, if a deal sounds too good to be true, it probably is! 
 
•    Find out more about auction fraud http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/fraud-az-auction-fraud  Make sure you don’t fall victim to a Christmas Con!
 
•    Stay safe this Christmas by taking simple precautions. Plenty of great advice from https://getsafeonline.org/ and http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/ 
 
Ticket Fraud 
•    Tickets can be a great gift - make sure you don’t end up buying fake ones! Ticket fraudsters don’t care if it’s Christmas. Always make sure you buy the tickets from official sellers Click here for more information on how to avoid ticket fraud http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/fraud-az-ticket-scam 
 
•    Find out what happened when these fraudsters tried to sell fake #LiverpoolFC tickets http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/news/five-men-on-trial-over-liverpool-fc-ticket-scam-oct15

 

24 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Paul Dickinson (Police, Partnership Coordinator , Nottinghamshire)

If you want to influence what issues your local beat team focuses on where you live or work for the next three months, complete our online Neighbourhood Priority Survey.
Together with meetings with residents and community feedback, the results of the surveys are used to help local beat teams set their priorities.
Completed anonymously, the survey asks you to explain what concerns you have about criminal activity where you live. It asks for information about a range of concerns, including antisocial behaviour, speeding, street drinking, nuisance vehicles and other criminal activity.
You can give more information about the offences being committed and the days and times incidents are happening. You can also pinpoint exactly where the problems are, with a marker on a map.
The information you enter into the site will help your local beat team decide which issues are most important to people in your area and what three things they should tackle over the next three months.
To have your say on policing in your area visit www.neighbourhoodprioritysurvey.co.uk
If you know someone who hasn't got access to the internet, but would like to complete a survey, paper-based surveys can be obtained from your local beat team. Call 101 to speak to them or visit www.nottinghamshire.police.uk and click on Your Local Police to find out who your beat team are.
For regular updates from Nottinghamshire Police, follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/nottspolice or Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/nottspolice

 

23 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters have set up a high specification website template advertising various electrical goods and domestic appliances. These goods are below market value and do not exist. The fraudsters will request your card details via the website; however the purchaser will then receive an email stating the payment failed and they must pay via bank transfer.

The fraudsters entice the purchaser and reassure them it is a legitimate purchase by using the widely recognised Trusted Shop Trustmark. The fraudsters are using the Trustmark fraudulently and have not been certified by Trusted Shops and therefore the purchaser is not covered by the Trusted Shop money-back guarantee. 

Protect yourself: 
•    Check the authenticity of the websites before making any purchases. Conduct a ‘whois’ search on the website which will identify when the website has been created, be wary of newly formed domains. You can conduct this search using the following website - https://who.is/.
•    Carry out online research in relation to the website, company name and the business address provided to identify any poor feedback or possible irregularities.
•    Check the Trusted Shops Facebook page where warnings about websites using their Trustmark are published. If you are in doubt about the legitimacy of a Trustmark then you can contact Trusted Shops on 0203 364 5906 or by email service@trustedshops.co.uk. They will confirm whether they have certified that website.
•    Payments made via bank transfer are not protected should you not received the item. Therefore always try to make the payment via PayPal or a credit card where you have some payment cover should you not receive your product.
•    If the item advertised seems too good to be true, then it probably is. 
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040

 

23 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Local Authority

Rhodri Williams (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Notts)

Nottinghamshire County Council Trading Standards Service are asking businesses to be on their guard about a letter entitled “Missing information about your VAT registration number.”
 
The letter says that the sender is looking to update VAT registration numbers.
 
The first page of the letter gives the impression that this is a free service, but the small print states that by returning the attached the form you are signing up to a £790 p/a advertising contract on a “UK-Data Control portal.”
 
We are concerned that local businesses may consider the letter to be an official communication and will sign and return the form leading to demands for payment.
 
We have checked the UK-Data Control portal website and have noted that several Nottinghamshire businesses are already listed on it.
 
We would like to assure Nottinghamshire businesses that the sender is not associated with HMRC or the County Council, and that you have no obligation to provide any information to this company.
 
If you have received one of these letters and received an invoice please  report the matter to Action Fraud at www.actionfraud.police.uk.  We also suggest you seek legal advice before making any payment.  
 

17 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Some great advice and reminders from Richard EVANS – The Telegraph
 
Why not strike up a conversation with older relatives, friends or neighbours to ensure they don’t fall prey to clever con artists
 
Fraudsters purporting to be from your bank can be convincing, but there are some things your bank will never ask you 
 

New ways to bank – by telephone, the internet and now your mobile – have saved us a lot of time but have also opened up opportunities for fraudsters. 
 
Their tricks normally involve pretending to be your bank, whether on the phone or via email. After convincing you that they are genuine, they ask you to carry out various plausible-sounding actions that will result in your account being raided. 
 
Here are eight things that fraudsters might ask you to do – but your bank never will. 

1. Call or email to ask you for your full Pin or any online banking passwords
If your bank does contact you, perhaps to check that a transaction was really made by you, it would not ask for more than three digits from your Pin to confirm your identity, and would never ask for online passwords.  
 
2. Send someone to your home to collect cash, bank cards or anything else

Having posed on the telephone as a bank employee to extract key security information such as your full Pin, the criminals may say they are sending an official courier to your home to collect the corresponding card. These couriers will have bogus “official” identification. 
 
3. Ask you to authorise the transfer of funds to a new account or hand over cash

Often criminals, posing as a bank, will instruct you that your account is under threat – usually from a “corrupt employee” or “cyber criminals”. You will be instructed to make an online transfer of money into a new “safe account” – actually the fraudster’s – or hand cash to a bogus employee. 
 
4. Ask you to carry out a ‘test transaction’ online

Criminals pretending to be from a bank sometimes email customers asking them to perform a “test” transaction online, perhaps because of a “technical problem” on their account. 
 
5. Send an email with a link to a website that asks you to enter your online banking details

This is the well-known “phishing” scam. 
 
6. Ask you to email or text personal or banking information

Even if the email address appears to belong to the bank. 
 
7. Provide banking services through any mobile apps other than the bank’s official apps

To download your bank’s mobile banking app, follow the link from its official website. 
 
8. Call to advise you to buy diamonds, land or other commodities 

Reputable investment firms do not cold-call. Fraudulent “boiler rooms” can be very persistent and persuasive, so just put the phone down. 
 
For more advice :

www.actionfraud.police.uk
www.getsafeonline.org

Or visit your own bank's website
 

12 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Myth- If I have anti-virus installed on my device (PC, Mobile, Tablet) I am fully protected from viruses

Truth – It is true that anti-virus provides a very strong layer of protection to your device. However, it can still be bypassed by sophisticated viruses aka malware. You need to ensure you keep your AV software, operating systems and other security measures up to date.

Links
https://www.getsafeonline.org/protecting-your-computer/

It is vitally important to ensure that you not only have antivirus installed, but that it is maintained and kept up to date. Why not check the settings to ensure that updates happen automatically so that you don’t get caught out?

AntiVirus Software JPEG
 

11 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Myth - If a company has a registered website then it must be legitimate.
Truth - It takes just minutes to set up a website in any name you want and at minimal cost which means fraudsters can set-up as website just as easily as anyone else.

Links
FCA have requested a link here to their warning list, where you can check companies against their ‘unauthorised business list’
http://scamsmart.fca.org.uk/warninglist/
Websites - JPEG

 

10 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Myth- It doesn’t really matter what information I post on social media sites as only my friends can read it.

Truth- By getting your privacy settings wrong or accepting people you don’t know as friends, you may be giving fraudsters valuable information about you and your habits. Personal details can be used to guess passwords, habits and vulnerabilities so you need to check your social media settings regularly. All personal information is valuable and fraudsters are very good at filling in the missing information.

It is also worth bearing in mind that your friends settings can affect your privacy.  For instance, if they comment on your post, their friends might also be able to view it.

Check your privacy settings monthly to ensure that only friends can view your email and telephone number.

For more information visit : https://www.getsafeonline.org/information-security/social-engineering/ 
If you use Social Media, there are also some great guides we recommend reading here : http://www.saferinternet.org.uk/social-network-checklists 
 

10 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire 

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Make secure fixing of Vehicle Registration plates to prevent theft statutory
The response that I have from the Society of Motor Manufacturers is positive but the manufacturers I have asked to introduce theft proof plates as a standard factory fitting are nonplused by the concept! So pursuing the idea that the Ministry of Transport will require all new vehicles and trade sales fit security screws in addition to all vehicles undergoing an MOT are fitted with security screws in 3 years crimes associated with false/stolen/illegal plates would be reduced. I have a huge amount of information on the subject and can send this to any interested people or organisations. In addition looking the rough Google related web sites gives a broader picture. My largest hurdle is spreading the message far and wide to gather support. I have purchased 1200 flyers printed by the Police for distribution to the trade and car clubs at the Classic Car show this Saturday but am currently confined to bed with sciatica. My email is erictindall.1@btinternet.com if you want a copy of the flyer https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/105275
 

9 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Myth- There’s nothing in my personal emails that anyone would care about.
 
Truth-
Hackers can use your email to gain access to all your personal accounts. Make your password stronger with three random words.
  
For more information on passwords visit :
https://www.getsafeonline.org/shopping-banking/passwords/  
https://www.cyberstreetwise.com/passwords 

Passwords JPEG

 

6 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Myth - Money Transfer Systems are always safe ways of making payments.
 
Truth - This is only the case if you personally know and can verify the person that you are sending the money to; you should take caution when sending money using these services as once the cash is collected, the recipient is untraceable and the money is not refundable.
 
For more information on how to transfer money safely, please visit GetSafeOnline
https://www.getsafeonline.org/shopping-banking/transferring-money1/

Money Transfer Systems - JPEG

 

5 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Myth - Changing details on my insurance policy or making an inflated insurance claim is not really fraud as everyone does it, I won’t get caught and Insurers can afford it anyway.
 
Truth - Insurance fraud is a crime that is taken seriously by both insurers and police. The cost of fraud does not affect just insurers, but members of the public also. The chances of being caught are high and the impact on people’s lives can be devastating.
 
Checking your policy carefully to ensure that all your details are correct.  If there is anything even slightly wrong, contact your insurer. Inaccuracies can actually render your policy void and the insurer not pay out.
 
For more information, visit
 
http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/fraud-az-insurance-fraud
Insurance Fraud  - JPEG

 

1 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Legitimate downloads are easy to find. Beware of illegal downloads and the consequences.

A great way to start is The Content Map
http://www.thecontentmap.com/ 
Intellectual Property Fraud - JPEG

 

 1 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Do you use Public free WiFi? Here are some things you should bear in mind

The Risks
The security risk associated with using public WiFi is that unauthorised people can intercept anything you are doing online. This could include capturing your passwords and reading private emails. This can happen if the connection between your device and the WiFi is not encrypted, or if someone creates a spoof hotspot which fools you into thinking that it is the legitimate one. 

With an encrypted connection, you will be required to enter a ‘key’, which may look something like: 1A648C9FE2. 

Alternatively, you may simply be prompted to log in to enable internet access. This will tell the operator that you are online in their café, hotel or pub. There is almost certainly no security through encryption. 

Safe Public WiFi 
•    Unless you are using a secure web page, do not send or receive private information when using public WiFi.
•    Wherever possible, use well-known, commercial hotspot providers such as BT OpenZone or T-Mobile.
•    Businesspeople wishing to access their corporate network should use a secure, encrypted Virtual Private Network (VPN).
•    Ensure you have effective and updated antivirus/antispyware software and firewall running before you use public WiFi
Other Advice 
•    Don’t leave your computer, smartphone or tablet unattended.
•    Be aware of who is around you and may be watching what you are doing online.
Public Wi-fi - JPEG

 

 1 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Did you ever stop to think that a criminal could be posing as an employer? You may be offered a job which involves asking you to receive money into your bank account and transferring it to another account, letting you keep some for yourself.

The money you’re transferring is stolen, and what you’re doing is called money laundering, which is illegal. Involvement in money laundering can lead to a criminal sentence of up to ten years in prison. People recruited by criminals to help transfer stolen money are known as ‘money mules’, or ‘money transfer agents’.

Many of the criminals carrying out this type of fraud are located abroad, so a money mule based in the UK is required to send the money overseas. Criminals try to dupe innocent victims into laundering money on their behalf. They normally do this by pretending to offer legitimate jobs via newspapers or the internet, and often target vulnerable groups such as migrant workers or university students who may be tempted by the lure of a seemingly easy way to make extra cash. 

Although the prospect of making some easy money may appear attractive, any money or ‘wages’ that you are given will be recovered by your bank because they are the proceeds of fraud. You will be the easiest link in the chain to track down and will be involved in any resulting police investigation. Your bank account will be closed down and details of the activity shared with other banks, making it hard for you to open up a bank account in the future. 
Ignorance is no excuse – allowing your bank account to be used for fraud can result in ten years in prison!
Make sure you know and trust the person you are giving your bank account details to. 
How to spot a money mule fraud approach and steps to take to protect yourself:
•    Be very cautious of unsolicited offers or opportunities to make easy money. 
•    Verify any company that makes you a job offer and check their contact details (address, landline phone number, email address and website) are correct
and whether they are registered in the UK. 
•    Be especially wary of job offers from people or companies overseas as
it will be harder for you to find out if they really are legitimate. 
•    Never give your bank account details to anyone unless you know
and trust them.
•    Be wary of adverts that are written in poor English with grammatical errors and spelling mistakes.
(Source : Financial Fraud Action UK)
Money Mules - JPEG


1 November 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

The internet and social media can be a frenzy of scare stories of people stealing dogs and it is not uncommon for Nottinghamshire Police to receive calls from dog owners worried about stories of travelling criminals targeting dogs or leaving chalk marks on properties with dogs inside.

Thankfully, we do not have any evidence of dogs ever being stolen in this way in Nottinghamshire and the number of dog thefts reported to Nottinghamshire Police is actually very low and there is certainly no increase in this sort of incident at all, despite the internet reading differently.

Well-meaning people share these stories to make others aware but often only spread urban myths that cause dog owners unnecessary stress and anxiety.
What to do if you have lost your dog
If you have lost your dog or would like to report a stray dog in your area, please contact your local council’s dog wardens using the contact details provided on this page
Report your dog as stolen
Before you call
If the worst should happen, please check with any friends or family members who may have access to your dog to ensure they haven’t taken the dog out.
Contact Nottinghamshire Police
If you do not believe your dog has been stolen rather than escaping or otherwise going missing, you should report the theft to Nottinghamshire Police on 101 providing as much information as possible about: 
•    The description of your dog.
•    Dates and times for when you last saw your dog.
•    The circumstances around your dog’s disappearance.
•    Contact names and numbers of anyone you believe may have access to your dog.
•    Descriptions of people or vehicles seen acting suspiciously in the area.
Protect your dog from thieves
•    Never leave your pet tied-up unattended, such as outside shops for example.
•    Make sure your dog is wearing a collar and ID tag when in a public place, as you are now required to do by law. Include your surname, telephone number, address and full post code and if there’s room, put ‘microchipped’ on the tag if your dog has a chip.
•    Ensure your dog can be permanently identified by its microchip or tattoo. A microchip is normally sufficient to identify your pet if it does become lost or stolen.
•    Ask your vet to check your dog’s microchip every year to ensure your details are accurate and up-to-date.
•    Clean tattoos with surgical spirit regularly. 
•    From 6 April 2016, by law all dogs must be microchipped and registered to an approved database by the time they are eight weeks old. Puppies can usually be microchipped from four weeks of age depending on their size, so ensure this is done as soon as possible.
•    Decide who owns the dog(s) within in your family.  Discuss who will own them after bereavement or the break-up of a relationship. 
•    Keep all documentation relating to your dog(s) in a safe place. Include clear photos of front and side profiles of your dog. Make a note or take a picture of any unusual markings.
•    Be cautious when choosing someone who will care for your dog(s) while you are at work, in hospital or on holiday. Be clear about when the dog will be handed over and who will collect it.
•    Use a registered boarding kennel or professional dog carer with documentation to this effect unless you know someone who is trustworthy that will care for your dog in your absence.
•    Train your dog not to go out of your sight on walks. Use an extending lead if the dog does not comply. Vary your walk times and routes.
•    Beware of strangers who show interest in your dog: don’t give details about your dog. Don’t allow strangers to have their photograph taken with your dog.
•    Ensure your garden or yard is secure.  Check it regularly for wear and tear or gaps. It should keep your dog in and trespassers out. Keep your dog in view when it goes out into the garden, don’t leave it unattended.
Please feel free to share this information with others – all of the above can be found on our website

 

31 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Fireworks safety
Fireworks are great fun but it is important to remember that they can also cause distress and injuries if not handled properly.
 
If you are using fireworks at home simply follow our guidelines to ensure you have a safe but fun bonfire night.
 
Remember Remember ... 
•    Only buy fireworks from a legitimate retailer.
•    You should never throw or set off a firework in the street, onto a road or in a public place.
•    You’re not allowed to set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am except on Bonfire night whereby the curfew is midnight to 7am.
•    Anyone caught causing a nuisance with fireworks will receive an instant fine of £80 and any fireworks found on a person under18 will be confiscated.
•    Never use any kind of accelerant i.e. petrol to start a bonfire.
•    Always inform your neighbours if you are using fireworks and be considerate.
•    Ensure your fireworks comply with British Standard 7114 or the European equivalents.
•    Remember, if you break the law on fireworks you could be sent to prison for up to six months or your parents or carers could receive a fine.
 
Report unauthorised sellers
Fireworks should not be sold door to door, from vehicles, market stalls or car boot sales so any activity of this nature is of immediate concern.

You can help to ensure your safety and that only reporting any suspicious firework dealing for officers to investigate to the Citizens Advice consumer helpline on 03454 040506. 

If you are planning to have fireworks at home, please do so safely. Remember the Fireworks Code. http://www.saferfireworks.com/firework_code/index.htm  
 
You can report issues relating to fireworks to the non-emergency number 101

 

29 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Are you aware of what ‘spoofing’ is?
 
‘Number spoofing’, works by fraudsters cloning the telephone number of the organisation they want to impersonate and then make it appear on the victim’s caller ID display when they telephone them on a landline. Spoofed messages can even appear in the same message stream as previous legitimate messages!
 
For more information on number spoofing, click here
http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/news/alert-watch-out-for-new-number-spoofing-scam-oct14

Spoofing - JPEG

 

29 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Action Fraud, with partners launched a social media campaign on Wednesday 28 October, to run for 13 working days until Friday 13th November which will identify some of the most common myths to raise awareness and help people protect themselves against fraudsters.            
 
A new myth and its reality will be tweeted each day and will be accompanied will a picture (JPEG).
 
In order to reach as many people as possible, Nottighamshire Police have decided that we will also support the awareness campaign via Alert. Here is yesterday’s myth buster.     

For more information on the campaign, visit              
http://www.nottinghamshire.police.uk/blog/2015-10-28/campaign-highlight-urban-fraud-myths

 
MYTH 1 - Wednesday 28th October (Dating or Romance Fraud)         
 
Myth - I can always trust the people I meet on online dating sites as they will have been vetted before being allowed to join.     
 
Truth - Always be cautious about the people you meet online, especially if they start asking for money to help a family member, to visit you or pay medical bills etc. Never send money or give credit card or online account details to anyone you don’t know and trust.


Dating Fraud - JPEG

 

28 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire) 

Nottinghamshire Police are urging the public to keep their personal belongings safe after a spate of handbag thefts across the county.
Handbags have mainly gone missing in supermarket car parks, when people are returning trolleys and leaving their cars unlocked and bags unattended.
There have been thefts reported in the Aldi car park on Sellers Wood Drive in Bulwell at around 2.45pm on Friday 23 October and 3.10pm on Monday 26 October. If you have any information which might help in either of these cases, please call Police on 101 quoting incident number 555 of 26 October or 481 of 23 October.
In Newark, there have been reported handbag thefts in the Morrisons car park in Newark at around 11.40am on Wednesday 14 October around 2.20pm on Monday 19 October. If you have any information that could help in either of these cases, please call 101 quoting incident number 289 of 14 October or 396 of 19 October.
Alternatively, ring CrimeStoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.
It is not thought that the incidents are linked but officers are reminding people to keep their belongings safe at all times and lock car doors.
PLEASE NEVER LEAVE HANDBAGS UNATTENDED IN VEHICLES, EVEN IF THE VEHICLE IS LOCKED. CARRY YOUR BAG WITH YOU.

We would also like to take this opportunity to remind shoppers to beware of distraction tactics whilst you are loading your shopping into your vehicle - people approaching and asking for directions or similar. KEEP YOUR BAG WITH YOU WHILST LOADING UP YOUR VEHICLE, NOT LEFT INSIDE THE VEHICLE WHERE IT CAN BE SNEAKILY TAKEN.

Hang on to your stuff.  Please feel free to share this information.

 

27 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire) 

The UK Safer Internet Centre have put out some great advice for the half term holidays re online gaming for young people!

www.saferinternet.org.uk is a great resource for online safety for adults and children - we highly v recommend visiting the site to learn more.

Below are some top tips on gaming for youngsters – why not use these as discussion points and awareness raising to make the Internet a nicer place for young people!

“Make sure you know how to stay safe whilst playing your favourite games this half-term break with our top tips for gaming. 
1.    Play fair: treat other gamers the way you would like to be treated.
2.    Keep personal information safe: don’t share your personal information when gaming online; this includes your full name, mobile phone number and address. Sharing this type of information could make you vulnerable.
3.    Meeting: meeting someone you have only been in touch with online can be dangerous. Only do so with your parents’ or carers’ permission and even then only when they can be present. Remember online friends are still strangers even if you have been talking to them for a long time.
4.    Look for age classifications: look out for the PEGI icon on games, to see what age classification it has been given, visit www.pegi.info for more information on age ratings.
5.    Use the tools: make sure you know what tools are available if someone is being aggressive or inappropriate in a game. Learn how to block, mute, delete and report on the games and consoles you use.
6.    Regular breaks: some games can be especially intense, so regular breaks are vital for healthy gameplay. It’s important to take regular breaks, at least five minutes every 45-60 minutes.
7.    Protect accounts with strong passwords: ensure that you have secured your accounts with a strong password. To do this, include a combination of letters using upper and lower case, characters and numbers.
8.    In-app purchasing: we hear stories of how young people have got themselves into difficulty by inadvertently running up bills when playing games online. Some online games, advergames, are designed to promote particular products and may encourage you to purchase items within the game/app. On smartphones you are able to disable in-app purchases by going into your phone settings. 
9.    Stay legal: as well as staying safe when playing online games, it’s also important to stay legal. It may be tempting to download cheat programmes to skip to a higher level, but these, and downloading non-copyrighted games, can expose users to unsuitable content and viruses affecting your computer.
Our resource ONLINE GAMING: An introduction for parents and carers provides advice to parents and carers specifically related to online gaming."

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO SHARE THIS ADVICE WITH FAMILY, FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES

 

27 October 2015

 This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Paul Dickinson (Police, Partnership Coordinator , Nottinghamshire)

If you want to influence what issues your local beat team focuses on where you live or work for the next three months, complete our online Neighbourhood Priority Survey.
Together with meetings with residents and community feedback, the results of the surveys are used to help local beat teams set their priorities.
Completed anonymously, the survey asks you to explain what concerns you have about criminal activity where you live. It asks for information about a range of concerns, including antisocial behaviour, speeding, street drinking, nuisance vehicles and other criminal activity.
You can give more information about the offences being committed and the days and times incidents are happening. You can also pinpoint exactly where the problems are, with a marker on a map.
The information you enter into the site will help your local beat team decide which issues are most important to people in your area and what three things they should tackle over the next three months.
To have your say on policing in your area visit www.neighbourhoodprioritysurvey.co.uk
If you know someone who hasn't got access to the internet, but would like to complete a survey, paper-based surveys can be obtained from your local beat team. Call 101 to speak to them or visit www.nottinghamshire.police.uk and click on Your Local Police to find out who your beat team are.
For regular updates from Nottinghamshire Police, follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/nottspolice or Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/nottspolice

 

24 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters have created a high specification website template advertising flat screen televisions for sale which are below market value and do not exist. Payment is being requested via bank transfer and will offer no protection to the consumer when the television 
Cyber Attack
Talk Talk, the phone and broadband provider, has been the victim of a cyber attack on their website commonly referred to as DDoS – distributed denial of service attack. This has led to hackers accessing Talk Talks servers and stealing personal data, which could affect over four million customers. It is currently unknown exactly what data has been stolen but Talk Talk has stated that there is a chance that some of the following data could have been accessed: 
•    Name and addresses
•    Dates of birth
•    Email addresses
•    Telephone numbers
•    Talk Talk account information
•    Credit card and banking details 
 
Protect yourself 
•    Be wary of any emails claiming to be from Talk Talk asking for additional information such as passwords even if they are able to tell you specific account details – this could be a phishing email and sent to gain access to your account.
•    If you have opened an email attachment please ensure you change the passwords for all your bank, email and online shopping accounts.
•    As well as e-mails be wary of any telephone calls claiming to be from Talk Talk that ask for additional information or want to gain remote access to your computer. Again they may tell you specific details about your account. If you get such a call do not give any details, terminate the call, use a separate telephone line/mobile phone and call Talk Talk back on one of their known numbers to ascertain if the call is genuine.
•    Monitor your bank accounts for any unusual activity that you believe may be fraudulent.

 

23 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

There is email in circulation that appears to have been sent from a legitimate Lancashire Constabulary email address. The email appears to come from ‘Lyn Whitehead’ and is asking the recipient to pay an invoice that is attached to the email.

The email has not been generated from inside the Constabulary or by the Constabulary. This email has not been sent from Lancashire Constabulary. A third party supplier to the Constabulary has had their data breached, as a result of the breach this Lancashire Constabulary email address has been spoofed and used to generate spam to recipients far and wide.

This type of email is commonly referred to as spam, and if you have received it you MUST NOT open it. Instead delete it from your email system to avoid infecting your device.

Protect Yourself: 

•    Do not click or open unfamiliar links in emails or on websites
•    Make sure you install and use up-to-date anti-virus software 
•    Have a pop-up blocker running in the background of your web browser
•    If you have opened the attachment and ‘enabled macros’ it is very likely that all your personal data will have been breached. You MUST change all your passwords for personal accounts, including your bank accounts.
 
If you believe you have become a victim of this get your device checked over by a professional.

If you think you have been a victim of this type of email you should report it to Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre. www.actionfraud.police.uk
 
If you do make a report please provide as much detail as you can about the email and any effects it has had on your computer. Additionally if your Anti-Virus software detects any issues in relation to this email please provide us with the details. 
 
More information can be found on Lancashire Constabulary website
http://www.lancashire.police.uk/news/2015/october/email-virus-alert.aspx
You can get more advice on this by visiting the following websites:

The most common Internet Scams are updated on http://www.cyberstreetwise.com/common-scams

 

21 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

RELEASE FROM LANCASHIRE POLICE :
Many people around the world have today received an email that appears to have been sent from a legitimate Lancashire Constabulary email address. The email appears to come from ‘Lyn Whitehead’ and is asking the recipient to pay an invoice that is attached to the email.

This is spam, and if you have received it you MUST NOT open it. Instead delete it from your email system.

If you have opened the attachment and ‘enabled macros’ it is very likely that all your personal data will have been breached. You MUST change all your passwords for personal accounts, including your bank accounts.

This email has NOT BEEN sent from Lancashire Constabulary. A third party supplier to the Constabulary has had their data breached, as a result of the breach this Lancashire Constabulary email address has been spoofed and used to generate spam to recipients far and wide.

There is now an investigation underway to determine the source of the attack on this third party, but we want to reassure you that the Constabulary’s systems have not been breached or compromised in any way. The email has not been generated from inside the Constabulary or by the Constabulary. If you have shared information with us, we can assure you that it is safe.

You can get more advice on this by visiting the following websites: 
•    https://www.getsafeonline.org/
•    http://www.cyberstreetwise.com/blog/dridex
•    If you have opened the attachment please ensure you change the passwords for all your bank, email and online shopping accounts - http://www.cyberstreetwise.com/passwords
•    The most common Internet Scams are updated on - http://www.cyberstreetwise.com/common-scams
If you believe you have been attacked by the virus, have had your data breached and have suffered loss as a result, then please report this direct to www.actionfraud.police.uk rather than reporting it to Lancashire Constabulary on 101.

 

21 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Throughout this week Nottinghamshire Police will be supporting #GetSafeOnlineWeek. 

For those of you who use Twitter, follow NottsPolice and keep checking for our advice and guidance to help keep you safe online.

Below is a round up of today’s tweets for those of you not on Twitter.  Attached is some helpful information on Cyber Crime.
 
Do you bank online? Click on the link for banking online safely advice, and what to look out for  ow.ly/Tu7Yd
 
Get Cyber Protected in 3 easy steps
1) Use strong passwords
2) Install antivirus
3) Download software updates
 
Using strong passwords to protect yourself from cyber crime is a must. For more information, visit CyberStreetWise ow.ly/TzdDK
 
Find out more about protecting yourself from cyber crime with security software & antivirus. Visit CyberStreetWise ow.ly/TzdM0
 
Always ensure you are running the latest versions and install updates when prompted to avoid vulnerabilities ow.ly/TzfdZ
 
Are you aware of any vulnerable people you know who use the internet? Encourage them to #getsafeonline and getsafeonline.org
 
Do you or your children use Social Media? Visit http://ow.ly/TzN3r for more information to stay safe online! #GetSafeOnlineWeek
 
Online not as safe as it used to be? @getsafeonline seeking reports of scams, illicit sites & more. Click to report http://ow.ly/Tu6AB

 Protect_yourself_online.pdf

 

20 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has been alerted to a pension scam whereby cold callers continue to target members of the public aged 50 to 60 years old to release and transfer their pension early. Suspected firms who advertise and arrange pensions are offering investments in alternative commodities such as hotel developments or property in Cape Verde, and operate as unregulated collective investment schemes. 
 
Often, the cold calling ‘pension companies’ involved are neither regulated nor qualified to give financial advice and classify themselves as a ‘trustee’, ‘consultant’ or an ‘independent advisor’ and offer exceptionally high return rates for investors.  
 
Some victims have signed documents that authorises a limited company to be set up using their personal details, including utilising a Small Self–Administered Scheme (SSAS). Whilst SSAS accounts and limited companies are essential for legitimate schemes, the fact that victims are unaware that this will happen suggests that the scheme may not have been fully explained to them, increasing the likelihood that there may be an element of fraud involved.
 
Protect yourself:
 
Further advice can be found at:
http://www.fca.org.uk/your-fca/documents/protect-your-pension-pot
http://www.fca.org.uk/consumers/financial-services-products/pensions/protect
http://www.thepensionsregulator.gov.uk/individuals/dangers-of-pension-scams.aspx
 
Ensure that you request that the risks and growth rates are explained and that you fully understand them before transferring your pension
 
Check whether the pension arrangement company is registered with the FCA. Registered companies can be checked using the FCA register online at: https://register.fca.org.uk/ 
 
Remember that if the offer seems too good to be true, then it generally is
 
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

20 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters have been phoning victims telling them that they have been placed in the wrong council tax bracket for a number of years and are entitled to a rebate. They normally say that this rebate should be worth about £7,000. Once the victim is convinced, the fraudster tells them that in order to receive the rebate they will need to pay an administration fee in advance. The payment they ask for varies between £60–£350. The victim provides the details and makes the payment, but then is no longer able to make contact with the person they spoke to on the phone. When they phone their council about the rebate and the fact that they are in the wrong tax bracket, the council will confirm that they know nothing about it and that they have been contacted by fraudsters.

The fraudsters have mainly been targeting both male and female victims who are aged 60 and over and live in the Sussex area, but it is likely that the fraudsters will also start to target victims in other areas. 
 
Protect Yourself: 
•    Never respond to unsolicited phone calls.
•    Your local council won’t ever phone out-of-the-blue to discuss a council tax rebate. If you receive a call of this nature, put the phone down straight away.
•    No legitimate organisation will ask you to pay an advanced fee in order to receive money, so never give them your card details.
•    If you think you have been a victim of fraud, hang up the phone and wait five minutes to clear the line as fraudsters sometimes keep the line open. Then call your bank or card issuer to report the fraud. Where it is possible use a different phone line to make the phone call.
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

19 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Throughout this week Nottinghamshire Police will be supporting #GetSafeOnlineWeek

For those of you who use Twitter, follow NottsPolice and keep checking for our advice and guidance to help keep you safe online.

Below is a round up of today’s tweets for those of you not on Twitter.  Attached is some helpful information on Cyber Crime.
 
Do you bank online? Click on the link for banking online safely advice, and what to look out for  ow.ly/Tu7Yd
 
Get Cyber Protected in 3 easy steps
1) Use strong passwords
2) Install antivirus
3) Download software updates
 
Using strong passwords to protect yourself from cyber crime is a must. For more information, visit CyberStreetWise ow.ly/TzdDK
 
Find out more about protecting yourself from cyber crime with security software & antivirus. Visit CyberStreetWise ow.ly/TzdM0
 
Always ensure you are running the latest versions and install updates when prompted to avoid vulnerabilities ow.ly/TzfdZ
 
Are you aware of any vulnerable people you know who use the internet? Encourage them to #getsafeonline and getsafeonline.org
 
Do you or your children use Social Media? Visit http://ow.ly/TzN3r for more information to stay safe online! #GetSafeOnlineWeek
 
Online not as safe as it used to be? @getsafeonline seeking reports of scams, illicit sites & more. Click to report http://ow.ly/Tu6AB


Protect_yourself_online.pdf

Cyber front.JPG
Cyber back.JPG

 

15 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Rhodri Williams (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Notts)

Trading Standards have been made aware of a rogue trader recently operating in the Sutton-in-Ashfield area who targets businesses. The trader will approach a business offering tarmacing services using road planings they have left over from a previous job. They may even state that they are from the local council.

It is likely the trader will quote for the work in square meters, carry our poor work, then demand an extortionately higher price for the work, claiming that they originally quoted in square feet, not metres. The trader may use elaborate methods to try and convince the business that he did in fact quote in square meters, and may become aggressive when the bill is queried
 
From our experience of rogue traders, it is likely that they will move to different areas of the County, and may target industrial areas.

If approached by any company offering tarmaccing services we advise to decline their offer. If you require such services please ensure you use a reputable trader, and not one that offers to do the work without you initially contacting them.
 
To report an incident involving this, or any other rogue trader, please contact 03454 04 05 06.

 

15 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Please tell us about the positives of Neighbourhood Watch (NHW) in your area
Have you recently:

•    Set up a new NHW scheme?
•    Have a particular success story to share?
•    Have you promoted NHW at a local event?
If so, please contact admin@nottswatch.co.uk with your story, including any photos (with permission from the photographer and subjects).  We would love to share your success stories via our newsletters and social media.

 

14 October 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

During this season the run up to Halloween and Bonfire Night, we have an increased amount of reported incidents of antisocial behaviour where some young people find it amusing to target local residents, many of them vulnerable, by throwing eggs at windows. 

We can reduce this problem if we can make it difficult for them to obtain eggs.  All shopkeepers have been advised not to sell eggs to teenagers.  Please also bear this in mind if you are sending your teenager to the shop for any supplies!
 
The link below takes you to our webpage where you can download a poster to display at home if you do not wish to be approached by Trick or Treaters.
www.nottinghamshire.police.uk/advice/prevention/halloween
Also on this page is advice for those of you with children, on enjoying Halloween safely and being considerate to others.
 
The final item on this page is for shopkeepers who wish to display a Police sign stating that eggs and flour will not be sold to youngsters during this period.
 
Please feel free to print these and provide to older relatives, friends and neighbours.
 
You are also most welcome to forward this advice on to others.
 
For those of you taking part, we hope you enjoy Halloween. For those not partaking, we hope this passes peacefully.
 
Anyone wishing to receive advice on safety, security and crime prevention are welcome to contact the Crime Prevention Unit on 101 extn 800 3011 or by emailing crime.prevention@nottinghamshire.pnn.police.uk

 

6 October 2015
This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters are targeting online advertising platforms where items are acquired for free. The fraudsters will list items on the website and advise any purchasers that they have recently moved from the area they were originally living in and can arrange a courier to dispatch the items for a fee. 
 
The payment requested for this service is usually via Money Transfer such as MoneyGram or Western Union, or an e-money voucher. The items they were promised are not received and any attempts to contact the individual to gain a refund are unsuccessful.
 
Protect Yourself: 
•    Stay within the auction guidelines stipulated on the website.
•    Ask to view the item in person.
•    Be cautions of making advance payments to a stranger via Money Transfer or e-money products.
•    If the item advertised seems too good to be true, it probably is.
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

30 September 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Trading Standards

David Brocklebank (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Nottinghamshire)

Nottinghamshire Trading Standards are warning people to beware of bogus telephone calls purporting to be from the County Council that target across the county.

Officers are re-issuing the warning as complaints to the service have been received again this week. Some complaints were initially made earlier in the year.
Reports have been made by a number of Nottinghamshire residents stating that they have been cold called by someone claiming to be from the County Council. The caller asked the residents if they had been involved any recent accidents or if they had PPI. When the residents challenged the legitimacy of the call the person hung up.

Nottinghamshire County Council advice is not to answer any questions and to end the call immediately. We also recommend you ignore cold-callers. 

The County Council will never contact you to discuss car accidents or any other claims management type scenario. If you do receive a call from someone claiming to be from Nottinghamshire County Council and you are at all unsure about it, ask for their full name and say you’ll contact them back. You can then ring the County Council on 0300 500 80 80 to verify the identity of the caller. If the caller is bogus they will probably hang up without giving you any details.

If the bogus callers have given you information which may help trace them, please report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or visit http://www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

22 September 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Ann Gransbury (Police, Administrator, Notts)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau’s (NFIB) proactive intelligence team is warning people of a new approach being used by scammers to carry-out vishing scams.
 
Fraudsters have been phoning victims telling them that they are calling to let them know that they have been placed in the wrong council tax bracket for a number of years and that they are entitled to a rebate.
 
The fraudster tells them that in order to receive the rebate they will need to pay an administration fee in advance. Once they have provided their details for the payment they will no longer be able to contact the person they spoke to.
 
Visit the following link for further information and to view Action Fraud’s advice on how to protect yourself from this type of scam - http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/news/alert-watch-out-for-council-tax-scam-aug15  

 

22 September 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Paul Dickinson (Police, Partnership Coordinator , Nottinghamshire)

If you want to influence what issues your local beat team focuses on where you live or work for the next three months, complete our online Neighbourhood Priority Survey.
Together with meetings with residents and community feedback, the results of the surveys are used to help local beat teams set their priorities.
Completed anonymously, the survey asks you to explain what concerns you have about criminal activity where you live. It asks for information about a range of concerns, including antisocial behaviour, speeding, street drinking, nuisance vehicles and other criminal activity.
You can give more information about the offences being committed and the days and times incidents are happening. You can also pinpoint exactly where the problems are, with a marker on a map.
The information you enter into the site will help your local beat team decide which issues are most important to people in your area and what three things they should tackle over the next three months.
To have your say on policing in your area visit www.neighbourhoodprioritysurvey.co.uk
If you know someone who hasn't got access to the internet, but would like to complete a survey, paper-based surveys can be obtained from your local beat team. Call 101 to speak to them or visit www.nottinghamshire.police.uk and click on Your Local Police to find out who your beat team are.
For regular updates from Nottinghamshire Police, follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/nottspolice or Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/nottspolice

 

15 September 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Apologies if you have previously received this alert; however as stated before, this alert will be re-sent regularly leading up to the 2015 Rugby World Cup. As a result of the Rugby World Cup beginning on Friday 18th September 2015, this will be the final update.

Action Fraud, together with the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau and the City of London Police, are working in partnership with Rugby World Cup 2015 organisers to disrupt those entities seeking to sell Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets without permission from the official provider.

We would like rugby fans and the general public to be aware that they should only purchase tickets from official sources and avoid being scammed.

Purchase tickets from an official source and avoid losing your money.
•    England Rugby 2015 Limited (“ER2015”) is the organising committee of Rugby World Cup 2015, due to take place in England and Cardiff from 18 September 2015 until 31 October 2015. Rugby World Cup Limited (“RWCL”) is the Tournament owner of Rugby World Cup 2015.  
•    RWCL/ER2015 wants to ensure that the public is not misled, by unauthorised ticket sellers, into believing they have purchased genuine Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets.
Where can you buy official match tickets?  
•    Tickets for the general public may only be purchased from ER2015 via official website at: https://tickets.rugbyworldcup.com
Where can you buy Official ticket-inclusive hospitality packages?
•    These can only be purchased through the official hospitality programme, operated by Rugby Travel & Hospitality Ltd (“RTH”) at www.rugbyworldcup.com/hospitality.
Where can you buy Official ticket-inclusive Supporter Tours (i.e. travel packages)?
•    RTH has appointed a number of Official Travel Agents (“OTAs”) from across the globe to provide official Rugby World Cup ticket-inclusive supporter tours and a list of such OTAs is available at: http://supportertours.rugbyworldcup.com/travel_agents_list.aspx).
How do you ensure that you are buying Rugby World Cup 2015 match tickets, supporter tours or hospitality packages from an official channel?
•    To check whether a company or a certain website is an official Rugby World Cup 2015 channel, use the ‘Official Checker’ tool which is located at www.rugbyworldcup/buyofficial.
Can you buy official Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets, supporter tours or hospitality packages elsewhere, other than as outlined above?
•    There is no guarantee that Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets (and/or ticket inclusive packages) purchased from any source other than RWCL, ER2015, RTH  (or those listed above) are genuine tickets (and/or ticket-inclusive packages).
 
•    Fans who purchase tickets and/or ticket-inclusive packages from unauthorised sellers run the risk of paying over the odds for a non-existent ticket, ending up disappointed by not getting to see the match they paid to see, and risk having their personal and credit card details stolen for use in other crimes.
Points to note about unauthorised activity:
•    It has been shown from the 2012 Olympics and other major events in the UK that ticket touts are often linked with other forms of criminality.
•    The unauthorised sale, or offer for sale, of Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets (and/or ticket-inclusive packages) may constitute an infringement of the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 or Fraud.
•    All official Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets are subject to ER2015’s ticket terms and conditions, located at: http://www.rugbyworldcup.com/ticketing/t-c
•    Tickets are STRICTLY NON-TRANSFERABLE and MUST NOT BE SOLD OR OFFERED, EXPOSED OR MADE AVAILABLE FOR SALE, OR TRANSFERRED OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED. ER2015 reserves the right to cancel without refund any tickets which ER2015 reasonably believes have been or are intended to be resold, offered, exposed or made available for sale, or transferred or otherwise disposed in breach of the ticketing terms and conditions.
•    Any person attempting to use Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets which have been resold in breach of the ticket terms and conditions risks being refused entry to or ejected from the relevant match venue.
How do I report unauthorised use of Rugby World Cup assets?
•    To report the sale of unauthorised general public tickets, please contact ER2015 at legal@england2015.com.
•    To report the sale of counterfeit Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets or the unauthorised sale of ticket-inclusive supporter tour/hospitality packages, please contact rwcrightsprotection@img.com
TICKETS PURCHASED OR OBTAINED FROM ANY OTHER SOURCE SHALL BE VOID AND MAY BE SEIZED OR CANCELLED WITHOUT REFUND OR COMPENSATION.

Please visit the following link to Action Fraud website in order to find out how to avoid being scammed when buying Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets:
http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/news/how-to-avoid-being-scammed-when-buying-rugby-world-cup-2015%20tickets-online-apr15

This is the last Action Fraud alert regarding the Rugby World Cup 2015.
 

 

2 September 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

People are being targeted to become “Parcel Mules” as part of a reshipping scam, which results in them handling stolen goods and losing out financially. 
 Victims are predominantly recruited through job advertisements and dating websites. They are persuaded to have items delivered to their addresses, and to pay for postage before sending the items elsewhere. Victims are contacted through Freelancer websites and invited to become a “Freight Forwarder” as an employment opportunity. The work is advertised as processing packages and forwarding them to clients.
 The items being delivered have been purchased through fraudulent means, including the use of stolen/fraudulently obtained cards. The items being delivered are often pieces of electrical equipment or high value goods such as trainers, perfume and the latest phones. 
If you act as a “mule” you are not only handling stolen goods, but also losing out financially. You will not get paid the promised salary and you pay for the postage and delivery of the packages personally. Additionally, you will have provided enough of your personal details to allow identity theft to occur. 
How To Protect Yourself:              
•    Do not agree to receive packages at your address for someone that you do not know and trust.
•    Be cautious of unsolicited job offers or opportunities to make easy money.
•    When accepting a job offer, verify the company details provided to you and check whether they have been registered in the UK.
•    Be wary of someone that you have met only online who asks you to send money or to receive items. Protect your privacy and do not give your personal details to someone that you do not know and trust.  
If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

 

 

26 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Paul Dickinson (Police, Partnership Coordinator, Nottinghamshire)

If you want to influence what issues your local beat team focuses on where you live or work for the next three months, complete our online Neighbourhood Priority Survey.

Together with meetings with residents and community feedback, the results of the surveys are used to help local beat teams set their priorities.

Completed anonymously, the survey asks you to explain what concerns you have about criminal activity where you live. It asks for information about a range of concerns, including antisocial behaviour, speeding, street drinking, nuisance vehicles and other criminal activity.

You can give more information about the offences being committed and the days and times incidents are happening. You can also pinpoint exactly where the problems are, with a marker on a map.

The information you enter into the site will help your local beat team decide which issues are most important to people in your area and what three things they should tackle over the next three months.

To have your say on policing in your area visit www.neighbourhoodprioritysurvey.co.uk

If you know someone who hasn't got access to the internet, but would like to complete a survey, paper-based surveys can be obtained from your local beat team. Call 101 to speak to them or visit www.nottinghamshire.police.uk and click on Your Local Police to find out who your beat team are.

For regular updates from Nottinghamshire Police, follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/nottspolice or Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/nottspolice

 

 

25 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Nottinghamshire Police are recruiting for Special Constables and Rural Special Constables. Please see the attachments below. 

Rural Special Constables Recruitment:

http://www.neighbourhoodalert.co.uk/Attachment/331506/122253/17789/17789_RSRecruitment.jpg

Special Constables Recruitment: http://www.neighbourhoodalert.co.uk/Attachment/331506/122253/17790/17790_SCRecruitment.jpg 

 

 

24 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud has noticed a rise in reports concerning the purchase of pets, in particular puppies, advertised for sale via popular online auction websites.

The fraudsters will place an advert of the pet for sale, claiming to have recently moved abroad and the need to re-home the puppies. 

Once a sale is agreed and payment is made, usually by money transfer or bank transfer, the pet does not materialise. The fraudster will usually ask for further advanced payments for courier charges, shipping fees or vet bills.

Protect yourself: 

• Stay within the auction guidelines. Be wary of paying fees via a Money Service Bureau, such as MoneyGram and Western Union.

• Consider conducting research on other information provided by the seller; for example a mobile phone number or email address used by the seller could alert you to any negative information associated with this number online.  

• Request details of the courier company being used and conduct enquiries regarding the company

• Agree a suitable time to meet face to face to agree the purchase.

• Be wary. If you think the purchase price is too good to be true then this is probably an indication that it is!

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone on 0300 123 2040

 

 

19 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters have created a high specification website template advertising flat screen televisions for sale which are below market value and do not exist. Payment is being requested via bank transfer and will offer no protection to the consumer when the television does not arrive.

Protect yourself: 

•    Payments made via bank transfer are not protected should you not receive the item.

•    Always make payment via a credit card or PayPal where you have some avenue of recompense should you not receive your product.

•    Conduct some online research on the website, company name and business address to identify any poor feedback or irregularities. 

•    Check the authenticity of websites before making any purchases. A ”whois” search on the website will identify when the website has been created, so be wary of newly formed domains. This search can be conducted using the following website - https://who.is/

•    If the item advertised seems too good to be true, it probably is

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone on 0300 123 2040.

 

 

14 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Police Cadets

An exciting opportunity to be a Cadet Leader

We are looking for new Cadet Leaders for the Cadet Programme starting in September 2015 for bases across Nottinghamshire. 

A structured two year Cadet Programme with supporting materials has been developed for Cadet Leaders to follow.   

Cadets are young people aged between 16 and 18 years who are passionate about adding an extra dimension to their lives. They play a vital role in helping us to deliver and improve the service we provide to our communities. 

Being a Cadet Leader is a great way to help young people develop new skills and knowledge in a wide range of areas.  Cadet Leaders will gain valuable volunteering experience working as a part of an enthusiastic team for Nottinghamshire Police.

The different roles for Cadet leaders at each of the bases are:

Principle Base Leader/Deputy Base Leader – In this role you will be responsible for maintaining order and discipline on your base.  You will allocate key duties to other leaders as well as uphold health and safety regulations for your base.  

You will be responsible for attending meetings on behalf of your base and will also help support Cadets with future recruitment and volunteering opportunities.

Base Leader and Admin Leader – In this role you will assist the Principle Leader with their duties in addition to keeping all base records correctly, assisting with the logistics of the base.  You will assist in ensuring that all base activities are risk assessed along with other general administration duties.  

Cadet Leaders will be involved in delivering a variety of interesting and fun sessions including Police related topics to generic skills like problem solving and team work all provided from the National Cadet programme.

Drill/Ceremonial Officer – In this role you will be responsible for delivering the drill programme, maintaining standards of dress for the cadets and leaders at your base.  As well as dealing with any disciplinary matters.  You will assist the Principle Leader in selecting cadets for ceremonial parades to represent police cadets and the force as a whole.  

Each base consists of between 10 – 30 Cadets.

If you have some spare time once a week (every Wednesday evening from 19:00 – 21:00 term time only plus some planning time) and would like to take part in this very rewarding scheme please apply now to http://www.nottinghamshire.police.uk/site-page/become-cadet-leader

Completed application forms need to be sent to police.cadets@nottinghamshire.pnn.police.uk

Full Induction training will be given. 

If you would like to discuss the role informally please contact us on 0115 967 2429 or email police.cadets@nottinghamshire.pnn.police.uk

 

 

6 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has been alerted to an Advance Fee Fraud in which individuals believe they are being recruited by Business Loan Scanner who will be moving to 34 Lime Street, London on 24th August. 

Applicants receive a job offer and are then asked to pay an upfront fee for CRB checks etc. 

However, please be aware that there is NO such company at this location and this activity is a fraud. 

If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

 

4 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Over four million people in the UK aged 70 and over still driving. And, as changes to how we renew our driving licences come into force, those with older parents/relatives/friends who are still driving are being urged to help protect their relatives against scams, and also make sure that they are still fit to drive safely.

There is no charge to renewing a driving licence in the UK for drivers aged 70 and over. Unfortunately, in recent years third party websites offering to handle driving licence renewals for a fee have sprung up – some even appear as Google ads at the top of the web search results. 

If you see an advert offering to renew a licence for someone over 70 for a fee, it is a scam.

We are urging those of you with older parents, relatives or neighbours who use a computer, ro make sure they understand that the official DVLA pages are ONLY found on the www.gov.uk website. We are trying to spread the word and alert them to the dangers of clicking on third party sites that offer to handle licence renewals for an unnecessary fee.

Another scam to be aware of is via email. In this case, drivers may be asked to verify their driving licence details by clicking on a link.

The DVLA does not do this. Any such requests should be ignored. The only secure way of dealing directly with the DVLA is via the GOV.UK website.

 

 

4 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has received several reports of rental fraud whereby empty premises are being targeted and the locks are being changed for the purpose of adding legitimacy to a rental fraud. 

The suspect(s) will find and enter an empty property for the purposes of changing the locks and then advertising it on online platforms, such as Gumtree, as a rental property. The suspect(s) then invite interested victims to visit the property for a viewing. Those victims which are interested in renting the property are then requested to pay a deposit and/or rent upfront in cash. 

In some instances the victims have moved into the property only to be evicted by the real property owner, or have found that the locks have been changed, once they have received the keys. There are several instances where this fraud has left victims homeless.

Property Owners: 

•    If you or someone you know currently has an empty property, encourage them to visit the property regularly to make sure that the locks have not been changed and no damage has occurred. 

Prevention Advice: 

•    Avoid communication with only email or mobile phone, request to see the property owner and ask for valid ID. You can also check ownership of the property using the Land Registry. 

•    The landlord will carry out their own due diligence and should request all of your details, references and proof that you will be able to afford to rent the property. Make sure that these checks are completed prior to paying a deposit / rent. 

•    Always view the property and the tenancy agreement before paying any upfront costs.

If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

 

4 August 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Seasonal rental fraud is an emerging trend with students looking for suitable accommodation around August, before the start of the new term. 

Fraudsters use a variety of websites to advertise available properties to rent. often at attractive rates and convenient locations. Adverts will seem genuine, accompanied by a number of photos and contact information to discuss your interest. 

Due to demand, students will often agree to pay upfront fees to secure the property quickly, without viewing the property, only to discover that the fraudster posing as the landlord does not have ownership of the property, or often there are already tenants living there. 

Protect Yourself 

•    Only use reputable letting companies.

•    Do some online research such as using Google maps to check the property does exist.

•    Make an appointment to view the property in person. 

•    Always view the property prior to paying any advance fees.

•    Look out for warning signs, such as landlords requesting a ‘holding deposit’ due to the property being in high demand.

•    A landlord will usually conduct some due diligence on any successful applicant. Be wary of handing over cash without the landlord requesting employment or character references.

 

 

31 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

It is important to remember that the things you put online and post on social media can stay there forever and might be the first thing people notice about you. A bit like a tattoo?

With every new profile, tweet or photo you post online, imagine you’re potentially adding to that digital tattoo. We have all got one and people that know you, as well as people who don’t, can see it and learn a lot from it. Take a couple of minutes to think about what yours may say about you?

Digital tattoos can show us at our very best or very worst. A lot of people, like Kent teenager Paris Brown, are finding out that our posts can have unexpected consequences years after we’ve forgotten them.

Remember, whatever you’ve put out there, it’s never too late to take control of your online reputation.

We highly recommend visiting this website below for more information

http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/14_plus/Need-advice/Digital-footprint/ 

ThinkUKnow is the education programme of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre aimed at young people, and encourages safe internet use. It is based around three key themes:

• How to have fun

• How to stay in control (or how to take control)

• How to report a problem

The education programme consists of a presentation, which is given to young people in schools, youth groups and other youth environments, a website aimed directly at young people, which also contains information for teachers and parents, a number of hard-hitting education films designed to make young people think about whom they are talking to online, and other resources including posters and a range of promotional material.

Please feel free to share this information to help raise awareness.

 

 

21 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Trading Standards

Rhodri Williams (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Notts)

Please be on your guard for a care home fees scam that is targeting retired Nottinghamshire homeowners.

A number of residents have received cold telephone calls from people who claim to be able to ‘ring fence’ your home and savings from the cost of care home fees, by putting them into a Trust document.

They arrange for a ‘Legal Consultant’ to visit your home who tries to persuade you to pay an up-front fee of several thousand pounds.  They promise that the Trust is a watertight legal document that will protect you home and savings for your children.

The truth is that the products they peddle will not protect you from care home fees and may have other unforeseen financial consequences.  ‘Deprivation of assets’ rules means that anything put into a trust to avoid care fees can still be included in the financial assessment.

Despite using names that make them sound like legal professionals, these businesses are not real solicitors firms and are not endorsed or regulated by the Law Society or Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Earlier this year we prosecuted two Nottinghamshire-based businesses for running a similar scam.  The ringleaders are currently serving four year in prison. 

These new businesses are based outside of Nottinghamshire and are currently under investigation by Trading Standards.

One Nottinghamshire resident was persuaded to send his property deeds to one of these companies and we had to intervene to recover them.  He is still owed several thousand pounds by the business.

Other people have exercised their right to cancel their contracts but were refused refunds.

Please treat all cold calls with caution: We never recommend employing a trader based on a cold call.  We also recommend that you research any company that you are planning to do business with before allowing them to arrange a sales visit.

If you have received a cold call that matches this description, please report it to us via the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 040506.

If you want advice on wills, trusts, or estate planning we recommend contacting a qualified solicitor.  Contact the Law Society on 020 7242 1222 to find a local solicitor who specialises in wills and probate.

You can also contact the charity Age UK on 0800 169 6565 who provide some excellent advice leaflets about financial planning in later life and the rules surrounding care home fees.

 

 

21 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has been alerted to an Advanced Fee Scam whereby mainly persons of Asian descent are targeted by the suspects who cold call the victim, purporting to be from the Home Office UK Visa and Immigration department, and inform them that a case has been received by the department against the victim, sometimes with a request to deport.

A request is then made for money to be paid mainly by Ukash vouchers or MoneyGram. Occasionally, money is requested to be paid into a bank account.

Also on occasion, victims have been asked to provide bank account details.

A telephone number is given which is a genuine contact number for the Home Office to give the call a form of legitimacy.

The UK Visa and Immigration department would not make any request for payments in this form.

Protect yourself: 

• Never respond to any such communication; 

• Any unsolicited contact followed by a request for an advance payment/fee is a good indication that someone is trying to defraud you. Do NOT pay any fees unless you are 100% of what you are paying for!!!

• Never, ever disclose your bank details. 

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040

 

 

15 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has received intelligence regarding two new Lottery Fraud letters/email attachments (Scam 1 & Scam 2) using the 2016 Rio Olympics as a theme.

The scams try to trick people into believing they have won the following:

Scam 1: An online lottery prize of £650,000 and a trip to Brazil to watch the Olympics as the recipient’s email address was chosen out of a possible ten million at random.

Scam 2: An online lottery prize of £820,000 and a trip to Brazil to watch the Rio Carnival and the Olympics as the recipient’s winning numbers 8 17 34 38 42 and 51 were selected.

In order to collect the winnings the recipient is requested to contact:

Scam 1: 

Mr Dima Robert

MillMan Street, WC1N 3JB. London A5200.

Tel: +447035973561

Email: RioOlympics2016@represnetative.com

 

Scam 2:

‘UK Pay out Officer’

Email:paymaster-office@bol.co.br

+44 7937428753

Protect yourself from lottery fraud 

•    Never respond to any such communication. If you have not entered a lottery then you cannot have won it.

•    Official lotteries in other countries operate in much the same way as the UK’s National Lotto.  

•    No official lotteries that we know of contact people to tell them of their win.

•    We do not know of any official lottery operators who ask for fees to collect winnings.  Any request for a fee payment is a good indication that someone is trying to defraud you.

•    Never disclose your bank details or pay fees in advance.

•    If they have provided an email address to respond to, be very suspicious of addresses such as @hotmail.com or @yahoo.com or numbers beginning with 07 because these are free to get hold of.

•    Genuine lotteries thrive on publicity. If they ask you to keep your win a secret, it is likely to be a fraud.

•    Many fraudulent lotteries have bad spelling and grammar – see this as a warning that fraudsters are at work. 

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

 

14 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

People looking for a cheap designer bargain online are being targeted by fraudsters advertising fake designer goods. The items received are usually cheap and inferior counterfeits of handbags, clothes and sunglasses amongst other things.

The general rule is ‘if it looks too good to be true then it probably is.’ Designer products sold at heavily discounted prices are an immediate sign that something isn’t quite right.

What can you do to protect yourself? 

•    Where possible, buy from well-known, High Street retailers. If you've never heard of a firm, or it is based overseas, be sceptical.

•    Avoid paying by cheque or bank transfer.  Use PayPal or a credit card as they will give you additional protection.

•    Search the internet. Type the website you are buying from and look for reviews of what others customers are saying about the company. Bad customer service feedback usually finds their way online quite quickly.

•    Check for spelling mistakes or poor grammar on websites as this may suggest the website has been put together by a fraudster.

•    Sign up to Action Fraud Alert at https://www.actionfraudalert.co.uk/ to keep you updated with what’s going on. 

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

.

 

13 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

‘The Dyre Wolf’ is a sophisticated fraud scheme that has netted more than $1 million from U.S companies. It is anticipated that British companies could subsequently be targeted by this fraud type.

Spam emails with attachments are sent to as many computers as possible within a targeted company. If installed, the malware - a variant of the malware known as Dyre – spreads itself into the company network where it waits until it recognises that a user is navigating to a bank website. A fake screen is then created telling the user that there are problems with the bank’s site and to call a number.

At the end of the phone line is an English speaking operator, aware of the bank that the user is attempting to contact. After obtaining the user’s bank details the operator commences a large wire transfer of money out of the business account.

So far those targeted work in large and medium sized companies, and at present the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau have yet to notice any reports of this type of fraud being reported through Action Fraud. 

Prevention 

•    Ensuring employees are well trained in spotting phishing attacks where unsolicited emails and attachment could contain malware. 

•    Ensuring all company employees are aware of the scam.

•    Do not give banking details to anyone. 

•    Only use confirmed banking phone numbers or those that have been previously used.

•    Do not follow links from an unknown source.

•    Do not open attachments on suspicious emails.

•    Run regular virus scans on devices. 

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

13 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Paul Dickinson (Police, Partnership Coordinator , Nottinghamshire)

If you want to influence what issues your local beat team focuses on where you live or work for the next three months, complete our online Neighbourhood Priority Survey.

Together with meetings with residents and community feedback, the results of the surveys are used to help local beat teams set their priorities.

Completed anonymously, the survey asks you to explain what concerns you have about criminal activity where you live. It asks for information about a range of concerns, including antisocial behaviour, speeding, street drinking, nuisance vehicles and other criminal activity.

You can give more information about the offences being committed and the days and times incidents are happening. You can also pinpoint exactly where the problems are, with a marker on a map.

The information you enter into the site will help your local beat team decide which issues are most important to people in your area and what three things they should tackle over the next three months.

To have your say on policing in your area visit www.neighbourhoodprioritysurvey.co.uk

If you know someone who hasn't got access to the internet, but would like to complete a survey, paper-based surveys can be obtained from your local beat team. Call 101 to speak to them or visit www.nottinghamshire.police.uk and click on Your Local Police to find out who your beat team are.

For regular updates from Nottinghamshire Police, follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/nottspolice or Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/nottspolice

 

 

10 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

A scam email is currently being sent to victims fraudulently claiming to be from British Gas or The Ministry of Justice. The attached document or link leads to the TorrentLocker ransomware.

This malware encrypts files on the victim’s system and requests a ransom be paid in order for the files to be decrypted; one reported amount has been £330 worth of Bitcoins.

It has been reported that some anti-virus vendors are detecting this and stopping the pages and or documents from being opened.

Protect yourself

•    If you receive an email that you are suspicious of do not follow any links or open attachments until you can verify that the email is genuine. To do this contact the organisation that the email has come from by sourcing the number independently from the email received.

•    If you believe the email to be fake, report it to your email provider as spam.

•    Ensure your anti-virus software is up to date this will help to mitigate the potential for virus to be downloaded. It should be noted that anti-virus software is constantly being updated and may not stop all viruses especially if they are new or been adapted.  It has been reported that some anti-virus vendors are detecting this and stopping the pages and or documents from being opened.

•    If you have opened an attachment or followed a link which you believe to be suspicious it is recommended that you run your anti-virus and/or take your machine to a reputable company to have it cleaned.

•    In cases where files have been encrypted it can be very difficult to retrieve them, and in most cases they will be lost. It is recommended that you always back up all files on a separate device or cloud storage to ensure they are not lost. Please remember that if a device is attached to the infected machine the files on this could also be encrypted with the virus so ensure they are kept separate.

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

 

8 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Courier fraudsters have been identifying themselves to victims on the telephone as “Detective Constable Martin Benton of New Scotland Yard Fraud Department”. The fraudsters will invent a story regarding fraudulent activity on your card and request your bank/card details. 

No such person exists at the Metropolitan Police. If you receive a call from someone purporting to be this individual, terminate the call immediately.   

Protect yourself against courier fraud: 

•    Your bank will never send a courier to your home

•    Your bank and the police will never collect your bank card

•    Your bank and the police will never ask for your PIN

•    If you receive one of these calls end it immediately 

Victim Advice: 

•    If you have handed over any details to the fraudster, call your bank and cancel your cards immediately.

•    If you want to call your bank, then do it from another telephone.

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

 

7 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters are targeting individuals who have recently expressed an interest in an online loan. Unsolicited calls are made by fraudsters who appear to be calling from a genuine company. They state that the recently applied for loan has been agreed, but an "advance fee" is required before the money can be transferred.

Once these “fees” have been paid, either directly to the fraudsters’ bank accounts or through a money service bureau, they are unrecoverable.

In many cases, fraudsters have asked for multiple upfront “fees” to address issues arising with the loan. 

Protect yourself: 

• Authentic credit companies do not charge fees in advance.

• Be wary of anyone calling who says they represent a credit company.

• Report any instances of a credit company attempting to request fees in advance of a loan to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040

 

6 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Do you or your children use Social Networking sites and apps?

The UK Safer Internet Centre has published easy to use checklists for various social media apps covering everything you need to know in order to manage your information and stay safe online while using these services. 

These handy guides include advice on how to manage your privacy and control what and who you share information with, how to block and report, as well as how delete or deactivate an account. 

http://www.saferinternet.org.uk/advice-and-resources/parents-and-carers/safety-tools-on-online-services/social-networks

 

 

3 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Did you know that insecurities account for one in three burglaries in Nottinghamshire?

Sadly that means a third were preventable and need not have caused the distress and trouble it did.

This method of entry is basically where an intruder is able to gain access through a window or door that has been left open and or unlocked.

This type of burglary can occur even when you are out or at home.

Do you leave doors or windows insecure in any of the following situations?

• Just having returned home from being out?

• Whilst you are out in the garden?

• Leave your door unlocked as you are expecting visitors soon?

• Just nipping round to next door?

• Back door unlocked whilst you are in another part of the house?

• Ground floor windows open whilst you are in another area of the house?

It is really important to keep doors locked at all times, and ground floor windows locked particularly in unoccupied rooms, even if you are vacating the room only briefly, ie to make a brew or nip out into the garden.  It takes a thief only seconds to gain entry, pick items up and make their exit.

Make sure that desirable items such as mobile phones, tablets, handbags, wallets and keys are not left in view of doors or windows. Keys should never be left in the lock.

We hope you enjoy the weekend, be safe, be secure, and don’t give thieves the opportunity to spoil it!

 

 

3 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) wishes to remind investors that fraudsters are still active and are using various methods to dupe victims into investing in fine wine.

Whilst it might be easy to identify a fraudulent investment in non-existent fine wine, there is another tactic which is much harder to detect that relies on limited knowledge of the investor in this specific area. 

In many cases, the fraud relates to the value of the wine as opposed to the existence of the wine. Therefore, fraudsters will be able to prove to the victims that they have the wine in stock, however the wine in stock will be significantly cheaper than the inflated price the fraudsters ask the victims to pay.

Whilst it may look like a ‘real deal’, the dramatically inflated prices make the promise of any returns unrealistic. 

Assessments of reports show that fraudsters charge victims an average of 47% more than the comparative market values at the time of sale.

The brokers who typically cold call victims boast that an increasing market in China will guarantee tax free profits. When questioned about risk, fraudsters will convincingly say that it is “extremely low”.

How to protect yourself against investment fraud: 

• If you’re considering any type of investment, always remember: if it seems too good to be true, then it probably is. High returns can only be achieved with high risk.If you get a call out of the blue, be wary; if in doubt don’t be polite, just hang up.

• Take the time to seek independent legal or financial advice before making a decision.

• Always check the credentials of the company you’re dealing with. Check for known fraudulent organisations at the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).

 

 

2 July 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Identity crime – where criminals steal someone’s identity or create a false identity – is increasing, and it’s believed that one in four UK adults has fallen victim to this crime. If a criminal gets hold of someone’s personal data, such as a name, address, or bank details, they use this information to open accounts, get credit cards or apply for documents such as passports and driving licences.

Nottinghamshire Police are supporting the current City of London Police campaign to make people aware of identity crime by sharing their advice to help you protect your personal information. Having your identity stolen can be very distressing, as well inconvenient to put right. Victims often find that money has been removed from their bank or their account has been taken over, a fraudulent passport or driving license has been created in their name, or loans, mortgages and mobile phone contracts have been set-up using their identity.

To help you avoid becoming a victim of identity crime, City of London police has produced advice to help you protect your personal information. This includes pointers on creating safe passwords, protecting internet devices, dealing with unsolicited phone calls and emails, and safely storing and disposing of mail.

The are a number of simple steps you can take to safeguard your personal information.

Tip 1: Be careful who you give your personal information to...and how

• Be very cautious about giving personal information – age, address, phone number etc – to people you don’t know.

• In public places make sure nobody can hear your conversations or look over your shoulder when banking, shopping or making other confidential online transactions.

• Be careful with the amount of personal information you share online. Only make the minimum available (your name) on internet profiles such as Facebook and LinkedIn and don’t post your address or date of birth.

Tip 2: Make it as difficult as possible to crack your personal passwords

Create strong passwords and use different ones for different accounts. For a secure password:

• use three words or more

• include a symbol and use upper and lower case letters and numbers.

Remember the more complex and unique to you your password is the harder it is to crack. Also don’t keep a note of passwords where they could be lost or stolen – such as in your wallet or next to your personal device. For more information about staying safe online visit www.cyberstreetwise.com or www.getsafeonline.org.

Tip 3: Always destroy or securely store personal documents

• Check your bank and financial statements carefully and report anything suspicious to the bank or financial service provider concerned. When getting rid of personal documents always destroy them – rip up or shred.

• If you have a communal mailbox or one in a shared area, empty it frequently.

• If you move home set up a redirection with Royal Mail for at least a year and notify your bank, credit card companies and other organisations you deal with ASAP. Only 29% of British adults report redirecting their post when they move house.

Tip 4: Don’t respond to unsolicited phone calls or emails

• Fraudsters are increasingly targeting people over the telephone, posing as bank staff, police officers and other officials or companies to extract personal and financial information. Often the fraudster will claim there has been fraud on your account and that you need to take action.

Your bank or the police will never:

• phone you to ask for your 4-digit card PIN or your online banking password

• ask you to transfer money to a new account for fraud reasons

• send someone to your home to collect your cash, PIN, payment card or cheque book if you are a victim of fraud.

If you are given any of these instructions, you’re being targeted by fraudsters. Hang up, wait five minutes to clear the line, or where possible use a different phone line, then call your bank or card issuer to report the fraud. For more information visit www.financialfraudaction.org.uk.

• If you receive unsolicited emails never reply with your full password, login details or account details. Don’t click on any links as you could end up downloading a virus (malware).

Tip 5: Protect your personal devices

• Protect all of your internet connected devices – computer, tablet, TV, mobile phone – by installing internet security software and ensuring that it is kept up-to-date.

• Make sure access to your devices is password protected.

For more information, please see attached guide.

 

 

30 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

Message to Dog Owners

As the summer weather has finally joined us, we would like to remind people to please not leave dogs in cars.  Even in just a few minutes, temperatures inside vehicles can rise rapidly, and dogs feel the effects and can become very distressed.  

Please also remember that the same applies in conservatories and caravans - these are not suitable for dogs to be left in when the weather is warm.  Always ensure that your pets have plenty of cool, fresh drinking water available to them

Information for everyone

There is a dog in a vehicle that appears hot and distressed, what should I do?

This does depend on the level of distress.

It is not generally advisable to force entry to the vehicle yourself.  

If the animal is showing signs of elevated distress, such as very heavy panting, windows steamed up, or worse still the animal is panting heavily and lethargic, contact the Police giving as much information as you can about the vehicle, registration number and location. Please wait and make yourself known to the attending Officer.  If the owner returns, please update the Police.

If the matter is getting near life or death for the animal this should be a 999 call to Police stressing the urgency.  If the police don't have time to get there, then you have to decide if you should take action. 

The law states that you have a lawful excuse to commit damage if:

'at the time of the act or acts alleged to constitute the offence you believed that the person or persons whom you believe to be entitled to consent to the destruction of or damage to the property in question . . . .would so consent to it if s/he . . . had known of the destruction or damage and its circumstances' (section 5(2)(a) Criminal Damage Act 1971). 

(this legal reference is slightly modified for clarity)

DON'T DO THIS UNLESS CERTAIN OF YOUR GROUND AND ARE PREPARED TO DEFEND YOUR ACTIONS AT COURT.

If the animal is starting to show distress but is not life threatening, try to locate the owner to make them aware.  You can still advise Policeon 101 of the vehicle details in order to try and make contact with the registered keeper to make them aware. If you are in a car park anywhere that may have a public address system, ask for an announcement to be put out.

For more information on what to do, and helping animals that are suffering heatstroke, please visit

http://www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/pets/dogs/health/dogsinhotcars

 

 

26 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters are targeting classified advertisement websites like AutoTrader to advertise vehicles for sale. Buyers are then contacting these ‘sellers’ to find out more about the vehicles and are being told to pay for them via ‘Apple Pay’. In this case the fraudsters are not using the genuine Apple Pay service and potential victims pay money directly to bank accounts in control of the fraudsters. Individuals receive emails claiming to be from Apple Pay with a web link to a cloned website with false terms and conditions of the ‘escrow’ service. Any money remitted to the fraudsters is then unrecoverable and the vehicles are not delivered.

Protect yourself: 

• Meet the seller ‘face to face’ and view the vehicle before parting with any money. 

• Be cautious of web links in an email. They may not direct you to the genuine website. 

• Report scam advertisements to the classified advertisement websites.

If the vehicle is below market value, consider whether this is an opportunity too good to be true! 

 

 

25 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Trading Standards

David Brocklebank (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Nottinghamshire)

Nottinghamshire Trading Standards are warning people to beware of bogus telephone calls purporting to be from the County Council.

Officers are re-issuing the warning as complaints to the service about these calls continue to come in.

Reports have been made by a number of Nottinghamshire residents stating that they have been cold called by someone claiming to be from the County Council. The caller asked the residents if they had been involved any recent accidents. When the residents challenged the legitimacy of the call the person hung up.

Nottinghamshire County Council advice is not to answer any questions and to end the call immediately. We also recommend you ignore cold-callers. 

The County Council will never contact you to discuss car accidents or any other claims management type scenario. If you do receive a call from someone claiming to be from Nottinghamshire County Council and you are at all unsure about it, ask for their full name and say you’ll contact them back. You can then ring the County Council on 0300 500 80 80 to verify the identity of the caller. If the caller is bogus they will probably hang up without giving you any details.

If the bogus callers have given you information which may help trace them, please report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or visit http://www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

 

 

22 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

National Neighbourhood & Home Watch Week is an annual awareness-raising campaign, held during the week of the longest day, to promote Neighbourhood Watch and Home Watch Week 2015!
This year it’s being held from 20th to 28th June. This years theme  is "Hang up on fraud" and National Neighbourhood Watch is working in partnership with Financial Fraud Action UK on a campaign to combat telephone scams. Please help spread the word by making your family, friends, neighbours and colleagues aware of how they can protect themselves against telephone scams and fraud.

Can you commit to try and speak to three people about phone scams during the Week, or forward this information to help raise awareness?  Forewarned is forearmed, let's not give fraudsters the opportunity! It is particularly important that we raise awareness with older members of the community who may not be online to receive this information.
Please find attached guidance on phone scams - let's get talking about it!

See flyer for more details

 

22 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

Have you got what it takes to become a Cadet Leader
We are looking for Volunteers to help support our Cadet Programme.
Join us and be PROUD to be part of our team

See the flyer for more details

 

19 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Royal Mail Email Scam
A scam email is currently being sent to victims fraudulently claiming to be from the Royal Mail. Attached to the email is the CryptoLocker virus.
 
The victim receives an email purporting to be from the Royal Mail stating that they are holding a parcel/letter for the victim. The victim is then required to contact the Royal Mail to arrange for the item to be resent/collected.

By following the instructions within the email the CryptoLocker virus is subsequently downloaded to the victim’s computer. This virus encrypts files on the victim’s system and requests a ransom be paid in order for the files to be decrypted.

Additional incentive is added for early repayment as the ransomware states that the cost of decrypting the files will increase the longer the fine is outstanding.
 
Protect yourself: 
•    Look at who the email is addressed to. Is it generic or specifically addressed?
•    Look at the quality of the images included on the email. Are they of sufficient high quality that they could come from Royal Mail?
•    Do not open attachments from unsolicited emails regardless of who they are from.
•    Do not click on the link supplied. Instead, go to the relevant website and log in from there.
•    Check the address of any email received to see if it appears legitimate. 
 
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

18 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Trading Standards

David Brocklebank (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Nottinghamshire)

Nottinghamshire Trading Standards are warning people to beware of a computer virus scam that continues to plague residents across the UK. 
 
A local man has received a phone call from a male saying he was phoning about a problem with his computer. The male said that that he could fix his computer to stop it crashing. The resident recognised that this was a scam, and when he confronted the male on the phone he hung up. 
 
Officers are re-issuing the warning as complaints to the service about the scam continue:
 
The fraudster's aim is to trick you into believing that your computer has a serious virus problem and that you need to act immediately or it will become unusable. You may be shown so-called 'errors' on your computer in the hope that you will be frightened into allowing the fraudster to remotely access your computer to fix the problem. At this point, the fraudster takes control of your computer and then requests payment of a fee to carry out repairs. There is no genuine fault so you end up paying for an unnecessary repair or bogus software. You may have left yourself exposed to identity theft, as your computer could have been deliberately infected with malicious software such as viruses and spyware. This could mean that the fraudster can access your personal details, such as your passwords and bank account information.
 
Trading Standards and the Police keep closing down these companies for scamming customers in this way, but copycat scams simply start up in their place. The organisers are difficult to trace with many of the companies operating from call centres abroad.
 
If you receive an unsolicited call from someone claiming to be from a computer maintenance company just hang up.  
 
You can also report the incident to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or visit http://www.actionfraud.police.uk 

 

17 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

People looking for cheap flight tickets are being targeted by fraudsters. New websites are continuously being created with slight changes to the company names with the intention to deceive the public. They offer tickets at bargain prices and usually request for payment via bank transfer. These tickets do not materialize and the funds are retained by the fraudsters.

Protect yourself: 
•    Where possible, buy from well-known company names. If you've never heard of a company, conduct some due diligence.
•    Use the internet. Type the name of the company/site you are buying from and look for reviews of what others customers are saying about the company. Bad customer service feedback usually finds their way online quite quickly.
•    Use companies that are ATOL or ABTA Registered. You can check this here: http://abta.com/go-travel/before-you-travel/find-a-member or www.caa.co.uk/application.aspx?catid=490&pagetype=65&appid=2
•    Check the authenticity of flight booking websites before making any reservations. A “whois” search on the website will identify when the website has been created, so be wary of newly formed domains. This search can be conducted using http://who.is     
•    Never send money to bank accounts. If possible pay using a credit card – that way you have some protection and avenue for recompense.  
•    Sign up to Action Fraud Alert https://www.actionfraudalert.co.uk/ to keep you updated with what’s going on.
If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.

 

2 June 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud has seen an increase in the number of small to medium sized businesses being contacted by fake bailiffs requesting payments for a phantom debt. 
 
The scam involves the business being cold called from someone purporting they are bailiffs working on behalf of a court, attempting to recover funds for a non-existent debt. The caller will then request payment by means of bank transfer and if this is refused, will threaten to visit the premises to recover the debt that is owed. 
 
A range of different businesses are being targeted; including Nurseries, Manufacturers, Hotels and Taxi Services. 
 
Protect Yourself 
•    Confirm what the debt is regarding; bailiffs are only used to recover certain debts such as council tax, child support and compensation orders. Bailiffs are not used to recover debts relating to private advertisement; these would be collected by debt collectors. Debt collectors do not have the same legal powers as bailiffs and will not have special court authorisation to act. For more details regarding this, please look at the Citizens Advice website
•    Double check with the Court or originating company to confirm whether the suspects are legitimate; if you use a landline make sure you hear the dialling tone prior to dialling as the suspects could still be on the line.
•    Request details of the debt in writing to access its legitimacy. 
•    Do not feel rushed or intimidated to make a decision based on a phone call. 
If you, or anyone you know, have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

29 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Trading Standards

Rhodri Williams (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Notts)

Nottinghamshire residents are being warned about door-to-door fish salesmen.
 
The salesmen are known to charge excessive amounts for fish that is largely unlabelled and some of which is unfit to eat.
 
The fish scam is a growing national problem. We advise that the best place to buy fish is from a reputable fishmonger at an established shop or stall.
 
Doorstep sellers also tend not to offer customers cancellation rights or a receipt to allow them to seek a refund if they are not satisfied with the goods.
 
Anyone who has been approached by fish sellers in this manner should contact the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.

 

29 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire

John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

All Newsletters can be found at the bottom of this page

If you have any interesting items to be included in future Newsletters please forward them to

admin@nottswatch.co.uk

 

28 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police

Paul Dickinson (Police, Partnership Coordinator , Nottinghamshire)

If you want to influence what issues your local beat team focuses on where you live or work for the next three months, complete our online Neighbourhood Priority Survey.
Together with meetings with residents and community feedback, the results of the surveys are used to help local beat teams set their priorities.
Completed anonymously, the survey asks you to explain what concerns you have about criminal activity where you live. It asks for information about a range of concerns, including antisocial behaviour, speeding, street drinking, nuisance vehicles and other criminal activity.
You can give more information about the offences being committed and the days and times incidents are happening. You can also pinpoint exactly where the problems are, with a marker on a map.
The information you enter into the site will help your local beat team decide which issues are most important to people in your area and what three things they should tackle over the next three months.
To have your say on policing in your area visit www.neighbourhoodprioritysurvey.co.uk
If you know someone who hasn't got access to the internet, but would like to complete a survey, paper-based surveys can be obtained from your local beat team. Call 101 to speak to them or visit www.nottinghamshire.police.uk and click on Your Local Police to find out who your beat team are.
For regular updates from Nottinghamshire Police, follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/nottspolice or Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/nottspolice

 

27 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood and Home Watch Network

Catherine Dunn (NHWN, Administrator, England & Wales)

•    Do you feel the police are visible enough?
•    What are your views on police response in your area?
•    Is crime under-reported?
•    How does crime and the fear of crime impact your community?
•    Are you concerned about threats to wildlife?
  
Help the National Rural Crime Network protect rural areas - give them your views on policing and crime. Act now to make your voice heard!
Click here to complete the survey.
  
In response to concerns from people living and working in rural areas, the National Rural Crime Network is launching the biggest ever survey of rural policing and crime.
In the face of shrinking budgets, it is important for the National Rural Crime Network to better understand your experiences of policing and crime in your area. Have you suffered financial loss, been concerned or worried about safety or feel the focus is generally on urban areas? You can complete this survey anonymously.
Start the survey
The aim is for the National Rural Crime Network to use the results of the survey to improve awareness of crime in rural areas and encourage crime prevention, inform government policy and help ensure funding is not disproportionately lost from rural areas. The results from the survey will inform the police and their partners in their work, helping to ensure the right services and resources are available to rural communities.
They can only do this with your help.
For the 10-15 minutes it will take, your response will make a difference to policing, crime and community safety in rural areas. I appreciate that you may not live in a rural area so apologies if you feel that this survey doesn't apply to you - but you may still have views about rural crime if for instance you work in a rural area, have family and friends who live there etc. and we would like you to get the chance to have your say.
Act now to make your voice heard!
Start the survey
Catherine Dunn
Campaigns, Events & Database Manager
Neighbourhood & Home Watch Network

 

 

22 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

People nationwide are receiving cold calls and are being persuaded to invest in 'Fine Art'.

Concerns around this include:
• How the commodity is being offered, such as how the cold callers persuade victims to part with their money.
• Hidden costs charged to the victims to view the product, shipping costs or additional fees to store the item.

How to protect yourself:
  
•     If the investment sounds too good to be true it probably is.
•     Hang-up on investment cold calls. Legitimate companies will not ring-up and offer you an investment out of the blue.
•     Do not give out personal financial information to cold callers
•    Check whether the art dealer is a member of a trade association, such as The Society of London Art Dealers (SLAD), The Association of Art and Antique Dealers (LAPADA), The British Art Dealers Association (BADA) or Confederation of International Dealers in Art Work (CINOA).
•     Request copies of old receipts, invoices and question the history of the previous owner of the art investment, to check if the product is genuine before investing

 

21 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Message sent by Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters often target ‘goods for sale’ adverts on popular online auctions sites, so watch out whenever you’re selling anything online. 

How does the fraudster operate?

The fraudster will contact the seller to say that they want to buy the advertised item.
The seller then receives what looks like a genuine PayPal email, to confirm that the money has been paid by the buyer into their account.

With confirmation of payment, the seller will then send the item to the buyer’s address. The seller will later find that the PayPal email is fake and that the money has not been paid. The seller ends up losing out twice as not only do they not have the money, but they no longer have the item to sell.

Protect yourself:

• Check your PayPal account to ensure that the money has been paid in and has cleared into your bank account before you send the item to the buyer.
• Do not be bullied or rushed into sending items before you know that the payment has cleared – a genuine purchaser will not mind waiting a day or two for you to send them their item.
• If you are selling a vehicle, think carefully when selling to overseas purchasers – especially if they tell you they will send an extra payment for shipping – check that the funds have cleared before arranging this.

 

10 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire


Message sent by John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)


Further to my Alert message issued on the morning of 8th May 2015 concerning the proposed reduction in the number of PCSO’s within Nottinghamshire Police, some people have requested an email address so they might contact Paddy Tipping, the Nottinghamshire Police & Crime Commissioner.  Paddy can be reached on nopcc@nottinghamshire.pnn.police.uk
Thank you for your concern,
John Wood, Chair, Nottinghamshire Neighbourhood Watch (aka NottsWatch)
 

8 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch in Nottinghamshire


Message sent by John Lennard (NottsWatch, Administrator, Nottinghamshire)

 
Proposal by Nottinghamshire Police to reduce the number of PCSO’s by 70 personnel
 
No doubt you have heard that Nottinghamshire Police are proposing to reduce the number of Police Community Support Officers (PCSO’s) by about 70 (equating to approximately 20% of the total number employed) because of stringent budgetary requirements.
 
Whilst Nottinghamshire Police confirm this will not mean the end of “Neighbourhood Policing”, such a reduction would almost certainly reduce its effectiveness.  If you are concerned by this prospect, you are advised to contact your local Police Inspector and/or Sergeant in writing, in order to register your concern and to request that Nottinghamshire Police seek alternative ways of meeting the financial constraints placed upon them.  
 
NottsWatch has contacted Paddy Tipping, the Nottinghamshire Police & Crime Commissioner, to inform him of our dismay at the proposed reduction in the number of PCSO’s operating within the city & county, and to ask him to use every ounce of his authority & influence to ensure that Nottinghamshire Police seek alternative ways of meeting the financial requirements without having to reduce the numbers of PCSO’s.   You may also wish to send an email or letter to Paddy Tipping, , again to formally register your concern.
 
John Wood, Chair, Nottinghamshire Neighbourhood Watch (aka NottsWatch)

 

1 May 2015

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police
Message sent by Samantha Hancock (Police, Crime Prevention Unit Manager, Nottinghamshire)

As the weather improves at this time of year, Nottinghamshire Police record increases in burglaries predominantly through insecure doors and windows, and some times whilst homeowners are at home. A number of burglaries have occurred recently where people have left windows open and doors unlocked at night before going to bed. Please ensure you do not become a victim of burglary simply because you haven’t checked and closed/locked your doors and windows.

Please ensure that any items of value, such as laptops, cameras, handbags, keys, wallets etc are NEVER left in view of windows and doors.  It only takes a burglar seconds to reach through an open window and grab items, so even if you are only leaving rooms for a few moments, it allows a thief the opportunity to take items quickly.

If you are spending time in another area of the house or out in the garden, make sure doors and windows are not left open and insecure in unattended rooms.
 
NEVER leave keys in locks on the inside,  we have also received a number of reports recently where offenders have reached through windows or pet flaps and been able to gain entry into properties.
 
Burglary and theft can take only seconds – don’t give them the opportunity!
 
Please enjoy the Bank Holiday weekend … but think security!

A few general advice tips: 
•    Make sure you have locked doors and windows at night – every night. 
•    Key operated locks should be fitted to all your windows and doors. 
•    Fit good quality locks to your exterior doors. 
•    NEVER leave keys in locks, this assists offenders!
•    Install PIR (movement sensitive) lights outside your property. 
•    Use timers for lamps ensuring that home always looks occupied. 
•    Installing an intruder alarm will greatly improve your household security.  If professionally installed and service annually, this is likely to attract a discount on your home insurance premium. 
•    Register you property FREE online at www.immobilise.com 
•    Protectively mark your valuable property by using UV pens, Selectamark, Smartwater or other asset marking products - if you would like any advice of the above, please contact the Crime Prevention Unit on 101 or by emailing crime.prevention@nottinghamshire.pnn.police.uk 
For additional security advice please visit www.nottinghamshire.police.uk, click “Advice” and then press on the large red square for “Crime Prevention Guides”

 

23 April 2015

Spam Emails Pretending To Be From Apple Itunes

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)
Message sent by: Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud and the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) have been made aware that there are currently a number of emails being sent out that appear to be coming from Apple iTunes, detailing a recent purchase.

The email states that if customers did not purchase the item they should click on the link provided to obtain a refund. Once redirected to a web page they are asked to fill out their card and other personal details. This is a spam email with links to a malicious web page that is being used to harvest personal details, possibly in order to access victim’s bank accounts.

Protect yourself:

• Double check where the email has come from before clicking on the link
• Check your iTunes account for recent activity
• Consider contacting iTunes separately to double check your account activity
• Remember iTunes will not request your personal details via email or through attached links
• If you have filled in one of the forms, do not use online banking until you have had your computer checked out by an expert.  Also consider contacting your bank to make them aware of the situation – money held in your account may be at risk.

 

22 April 2015

Bogus Caller Alert

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Trading Standards
Message sent by: David Brocklebank (Nottinghamshire County Council, Trading Standards Officer, Nottinghamshire)

Reports have been made by a number of Nottinghamshire residents stating that they have been cold called by someone claiming to be from the County Council. The caller asked the residents if they had been involved in any recent car accidents. The residents realised it was a scam call and did the right thing and hung up.
 
The County Council will never contact you to discuss car accidents or any other claims management type scenario. If you do receive a call from someone claiming to be from Nottinghamshire County Council and you are at all unsure about it, ask for their full name and say you’ll contact them back. You can then ring the County Council on 0300 500 80 80 to verify the identity of the caller. If the caller is bogus they will probably hang up without giving you any details.

Trading Standards recommend you ignore cold-callers. 
 
To report suspicious callers in your area, or to receive further advice, please phone Citizens Advice Consumer Service on: 03454 04 05 06

 

20 April 2015

Beware: Cloned National Savings & Investments Website Is Offering “Investments” 

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)
Message sent by: Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Fraudsters have set up a bogus website claiming to be the official site of National Savings & Investments (NS&I) and are contacting members of the public, cold calling them and offering them the chance to invest in 65+ Bonds (also known as Pensioner Bonds).
Members of the public who are searching for the official website (for example on search engines) may be directed to the fake one which then asks them to supply contact information.
Victims are then receiving a follow up e-mail and/or phone call from the fraudsters who are requesting evidence of identity documents and bank account details either over the phone or by sending the victims fake forms to fill out. A common name that appears on the emails sent by the fraudsters is ‘Kevin Archer’.

Avoid being a victim of fraud:
•    Do not pass personal or banking information to companies that cold call you.
•    Please note that the only domain name (website address) that is legitimate is www.nsandi.com
•    National Savings & Investments (NS&I) do not make sales calls to potential customers (cold calls) so do not enter into discussion with cold callers claiming to be NS&I.
•    The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau is committed to tackling all types of fraud and the Cyber Prevention and Disruption Team aims to do this by disrupting and taking down fake and fraudulent websites.
•    If you have been a victim of fraud or suspect a company of fraud please contact Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or via the online reporting tool at www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

16 April 2015

Influence Policing In Your Area

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Nottinghamshire Police
Message sent by: Paul Dickinson (Police, Partnership Coordinator , Nottinghamshire)

If you want to influence what issues your local beat team focuses on where you live or work for the next three months, complete our online Neighbourhood Priority Survey.
Together with meetings with residents and community feedback, the results of the surveys are used to help local beat teams set their priorities.
Completed anonymously, the survey asks you to explain what concerns you have about criminal activity where you live. It asks for information about a range of concerns, including antisocial behaviour, speeding, street drinking, nuisance vehicles and other criminal activity.
You can give more information about the offences being committed and the days and times incidents are happening. You can also pinpoint exactly where the problems are, with a marker on a map.
The information you enter into the site will help your local beat team decide which issues are most important to people in your area and what three things they should tackle over the next three months.
To have your say on policing in your area visit www.neighbourhoodprioritysurvey.co.uk
If you know someone who hasn't got access to the internet, but would like to complete a survey, paper-based surveys can be obtained from your local beat team. Call 101 to speak to them or visit www.nottinghamshire.police.uk and click on Your Local Police to find out who your beat team are.
For regular updates from Nottinghamshire Police, follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/nottspolice

 

13 April 2015

Rugby World Cup 2015 - Avoid Bogus Ticket Websites/Sellers

This is a message sent via Nottinghamshire Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)
Message sent by: Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Apologies if you have previously received this alert; however as stated below, this alert will be re-sent regularly leading up to the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

Action Fraud, together with the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau and the City of London Police, are working in partnership with Rugby World Cup 2015 organisers to disrupt those entities seeking to sell Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets without permission from the official provider.

We would like rugby fans and the general public to be aware that they should only purchase tickets from official sources and avoid being scammed.

Purchase tickets from an official source and avoid losing your money. 
•    England Rugby 2015 Limited (“ER2015”) is the organising committee of Rugby World Cup 2015, due to take place in England and Cardiff from 18 September 2015 until 31 October 2015. Rugby World Cup Limited (“RWCL”) is the Tournament owner of Rugby World Cup 2015.  
•    RWCL/ER2015 wants to ensure that the public is not misled, by unauthorised ticket sellers, into believing they have purchased genuine Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets.
Where can you buy official match tickets?  
•    Tickets for the general public may only be purchased from ER2015 via official website at: https://tickets.rugbyworldcup.com

Where can you buy Official ticket-inclusive hospitality packages? 
•    These can only be purchased through the official hospitality programme, operated by Rugby Travel & Hospitality Ltd (“RTH”) at www.rugbyworldcup.com/hospitality.
Where can you buy Official ticket-inclusive Supporter Tours (i.e. travel packages)? 
•    RTH has appointed a number of Official Travel Agents (“OTAs”) from across the globe to provide official Rugby World Cup ticket-inclusive supporter tours and a list of such OTAs is available at: http://supportertours.rugbyworldcup.com/travel_agents_list.aspx).

How do you ensure that you are buying Rugby World Cup 2015 match tickets, supporter tours or hospitality packages from an official channel? 
•    To check whether a company or a certain website is an official Rugby World Cup 2015 channel, use the ‘Official Checker’ tool which is located at www.rugbyworldcup/buyofficial.
Can you buy official Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets, supporter tours or hospitality packages elsewhere, other than as outlined above? 
•    There is no guarantee that Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets (and/or ticket inclusive packages) purchased from any source other than RWCL, ER2015, RTH  (or those listed above) are genuine tickets (and/or ticket-inclusive packages).
•    Fans who purchase tickets and/or ticket-inclusive packages from unauthorised sellers run the risk of paying over the odds for a non-existent ticket, ending up disappointed by not getting to see the match they paid to see, and risk having their personal and credit card details stolen for use in other crimes.
Points to note about unauthorised activity: 
•    It has been shown from the 2012 Olympics and other major events in the UK that ticket touts are often linked with other forms of criminality.
•    The unauthorised sale, or offer for sale, of Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets (and/or ticket-inclusive packages) may constitute an infringement of the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 or Fraud.
•    All official Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets are subject to ER2015’s ticket terms and conditions, located at: http://www.rugbyworldcup.com/ticketing/t-c
•    Tickets are STRICTLY NON-TRANSFERABLE and MUST NOT BE SOLD OR OFFERED, EXPOSED OR MADE AVAILABLE FOR SALE, OR TRANSFERRED OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED. ER2015 reserves the right to cancel without refund any tickets which ER2015 reasonably believes have been or are intended to be resold, offered, exposed or made available for sale, or transferred or otherwise disposed in breach of the ticketing terms and conditions.
•    Any person attempting to use Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets which have been resold in breach of the ticket terms and conditions risks being refused entry to or ejected from the relevant match venue.
How do I report unauthorised use of Rugby World Cup assets? 
•    To report the sale of unauthorised general public tickets, please contact ER2015 at legal@england2015.com
•    To report the sale of counterfeit Rugby World Cup 2015 tickets or the unauthorised sale of ticket-inclusive supporter tour/hospitality packages, please contact rwcrightsprotection@img.com
TICKETS PURCHASED OR OBTAINED FROM ANY OTHER SOURCE SHALL BE VOID AND MAY BE SEIZED OR CANCELLED WITHOUT REFUND OR COMPENSATION.

Action Fraud will be replicating this alert on a regular basis, leading up to the 2015 Rugby World Cup to prevent members of the community being affected by this type/similar fraud. Please bear with us until September 2015