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Advice regarding E-Scooters

The following was copied from the Kent Police Website;

Electric scooter owners in Maidstone are reminded to comply with the law and be considerate of other road users.

The warning is issued after police community support officers seized an e-scooter from a child after he was seen riding it in a dangerous manner in Plains Avenue, on Wednesday 2 December 2020.  The boy had been advised by the same officers regarding a similar incident a few days earlier. His parent was asked to attend the police station to retrieve it and they received guidance regarding their son's conduct.

Inspector Stephen Kent of Maidstone's Community Safety Unit said: 'In the town centre and surrounding housing estates we have been receiving reports of the antisocial and dangerous use of e-scooters.
'Owners should be aware that these currently fall under the same laws and regulations that apply to all motor vehicles. This means for use on a public road the user requires insurance, vehicle tax, a driving licence and registration.'

Illegal use

The use of e-scooters on pavements, in cycle lanes and in pedestrian-only areas is illegal and, in general, they should only be used on private land with the landowner’s permission.

Inspector Kent continued: 'Our officers will be stopping and giving words of advice to e-scooter users and will seize the equipment where offences have been committed.  Where appropriate, persistent offenders or dangerous riders can be issued with a fixed penalty notice or receive a traffic offence report.'

 

The following is a summary copied from the .gov.uk website.

“Powered transporters” is a term used to cover a variety of novel and emerging personal transport devices which are powered by a motor, including e-scooters. 

Given how powered transporters are motorised and designed, they fall within the legal definition of a “motor vehicle”. Therefore the laws that apply to motor vehicles apply to powered transporters.

It is illegal to use a powered transporter:

  • on a public road without complying with a number of legal requirements, which potential users will find very difficult
  • in spaces that are set aside for use by pedestrians, cyclists, and horse-riders; this includes on the pavement and in cycle lanes

Any person who uses a powered transporter on a public road or other prohibited space in breach of the law is committing a criminal offence and can be prosecuted.

It is legal to use a powered transporter:

  • on private land with the permission of the land owner

Please specifically note the following;

“If the user of a powered transporter could meet these requirements, it might in principle be lawful for them to use public roads. However, it is likely that they will find it very difficult to comply with all of these requirements, meaning that it would be a criminal offence to use them on the road.”

The term “powered transporters” does not include electrically assisted pedal cycles (EAPCs), which have their own regulatory framework.